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Thread: Noisey Pipes and rattling?...

  1. #1

    Question Noisey Pipes and rattling?...

    Our house was built in the 1980s, but we bought it in 2003. I didn't notice it at the time of purchase, but over the passed few years the pipes seems to be really noisey. It's hard to explain, but the sound is that of really loud rushing water. A deep hissing sound. Like if you went "SHHHHHHHH" in a low voice and loud. It's so loud in fact that when my wife runs water in an upstairs bathroom, I have to turn up the TV in the living room beneith it.
    We also get an awful rattling noise when the washing machine is filling, and a loud bang when we shut off the faucet in the kitchen. I have drained the lines a couple of times thinking it was air, but it never fixes the problem.
    This all may be one thing or several things, but I would sure appreciate any ideas you guys have as to what it is, and how to fix it.

    Thank you
    Sean

    Last edited by Terry; 02-22-2009 at 09:22 AM.

  2. #2
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    The banging is water hammer and can be helped by the installation of a water hammer arrestor...you may want to check and see if you have a pressure reducing valve that has gone bad as excessive pressure could cause this to start.... the other noise sounds like you are describing water falling down the main stack...there would be little you can do for that with out tearing out walls and soundproofing the area which in most instances would not do a whole lot to reduce the noise because in most cases there would be little room to add sound reducing insulation...

    Last edited by Terry; 02-22-2009 at 09:15 AM.

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    I don't see a pressure reducer in the house. In our part of the country (Aurora, CO), the meter and service shut off is out at the street, and then there is a main shut off for the house in the basement. I don't believe I've seen a reducer after the main shut off.

    The other sound isn't the same as water running down the main stack. I have heard that but typically only in the basement. That is more of a "draining" sound for lack of a better word. The sound I hear is a deffinetly a supply issue.

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member jch's Avatar
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    I suspect you're hearing turbulence in the supply pipes, often at 90-degree elbows, or at non-reamed joints.

    You have a few options:
    1. install larger diameter supply pipe (to lower water velocity within it)
    2. mechanically decouple the supply pipes from the wooden structure (rubber doughnuts etc)
    3. switch from copper to PEX and avoid using fittings (i.e. run home-run stretches of pipe with large-radius bends)
    4. keep turning up the TV


    Does this help?
    ----------
    - John

  5. #5
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    There is a maximum flow that is safe for pipes depending on their size. Now, it is often hard to exceed that unless the incoming water pressure is excessive. You can buy an inexpensive water pressure gauge at a big-box store for around $10. You might want to check your pressure. Many of the gauges have a second hand that records the maximum pressure seen in the system, so leave it installed overnight when the pressure often peaks. A pressure reduction valve might quiet things down, but you won't know until you determine what pressure you actually have. No sense in adding one if that isn't an issue.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #6

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    "Turbulence" is a good word! That sort of sounds like an accurate description.

    What should my Max water pressure be at for my house?!

    Funny thing is that I get more noise from the sinks and tub, but the shower and toilets are relatively quiet.

  7. #7
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Most places require (suggest?) a PRV to reduce the pressure if it gets above 80#. Keep in mind that what you have during the day may be quite different than late at night and early morning. During that time, the utility is usually filling up the water towers and there's little use, so the pressure peaks.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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