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Thread: Bath Tub NEWBIE

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member xjjeepman's Avatar
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    Exclamation Bath Tub NEWBIE

    Hello all, new here.

    I am planning on remodeling my 2nd bathroom and would like to do most the work myself. I have experience in removing/installing toilets, vanity's, sinks etc. But never did a bath tub. My current setup is an older ~1984 thin steel tub (says Beatz or Boatz on the side i think in script)(in good shape but too narrow and slippery) and would like to replace it maybe with an Acrylic one as the steel ones ive seen are the same as what i have now, too small/low.

    1st question is, how do i go about removing it? Do i just break all the tile around the edges and cut sheetrock? How will it most likely be mounted? How do i access the plubing such as the drain? Its on my second floor so i cant go through the ceiling. Any pointers would be much appreciated!

    When i install the new one should i put any kind of water proof membrane under it for the hell of it? If i go with tile for the surround should i just tile over the existing sheetrock or put up hardibacker type material over the sheetrock then tile? And if i go that route do i need to worry about placing the backer over the lip of the tup creating a bow out since it will be mounted over sheetrock?

    TIA!
    Last edited by xjjeepman; 02-09-2009 at 11:01 AM.

  2. #2
    DIY Junior Member xjjeepman's Avatar
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    Here r some pics of the horrible bathroom, its a shame because the tub and tile arent in bad shape but the tub is just too narrow and the tile and floor oudated.


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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    You will need to remove a lot more than just one row of tiles. Plan on several rows. Plan on removing the toilet. Plan on removing drwall to foot outside the tub.

    The tub is 60" long end to end, so if you measure what you have, tile to tile, it will be between 57 and 58, so you realize how much more clearance you need to get a new one in.

    Redoing the floor is easy. Considering that the tile and tub are in good shape, you might want to put in new flooring, put some non-slip strips on the tub, and ride it out until you are ready for a complete bath remodel.
    Last edited by jimbo; 02-09-2009 at 12:18 PM.

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    DIY Junior Member xjjeepman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo View Post
    You will need to remove a lot more than just one row of tiles. Plan on several rows. Plan on removing the toilet. Plan on removing drwall to foot outside the tub.

    The tub is 60" long end to end, so if you measure what you have, tile to tile, it will be between 57 and 58, so you realize how much more clearance you need to get a new on in.
    Oh i definitely was going to remove all the tile (as i said i need to re-tile anyways) and was going to rip out the linoleuom floor, toilet, etc anyways as i will be replacing them as well. What i wasnt sure of was how much sheetrock i will need to remove and how bathtubs are usually anchored/mounted. Thx

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Unless you have an access panel at the drain end, it is tough to make the final drain connection without going through either the wall at that end or the celing below. Assuming it is also used as a shower, you do NOT want drywall in there...tear out the walls and replace with cbu. Put a vapor barrier up on the walls and drape it over the tiling flange of the tub (cut it off after the cbu is up). If the tile are small, you'll want to bring the cbu down over the lip. This means either shimming out the cbu so it can fit over, or if the opening will allow, notching the studs so the tub can have its flange flush with the wall. Good tiling help at www.johnbridge.com.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Junior Member xjjeepman's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info jadnashua;
    I guess i can always create an access point from one of my bedrooms closets if need be. What is cbu? Sorry for the dumb questions, not up to par on all the lingo yet. So no green drywall at all? Just vapor barrier on the studs then cbu (is that durock? cement board?) Also, can i stuff some fiberglass insulation in there for sound dampening? Or is foam board better? And do you know how most tubs are anchored? What i can expect thats holding it? Thx again!

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member xjjeepman's Avatar
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    Oh and since i have swirls on my drywall ceiling will i be able to take the walls out without damaging the ceiling??? Maybe im better off with just getting a surround. I mean, they didnt use cement board and all this other fancy stuff when this was put together-it looks like they just slapped the tiles on the drywall which probably wasnt even greenboard..

  8. #8
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    cbu - cementious backer unit (aka cement board). National codes (local may not) no longer allow greenboard use in wet areas. CBU is always better, and code approved everywhere.

    Tubs typically have a ledger board to support the edges, then depending on the tub, nails or something to hold the edge to the studs - usually just catches the edge, but it depends on the brand and design. It's also best to set the thing in something to support it well, stuctolite, deck mud, etc. That helps to keep the bottom supported, it allows you to ensure it is totally level.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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