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Thread: 220 gallon fish tank weight????

  1. #1

    Default 220 gallon fish tank weight????

    Hi I have ordered a cabinet and canopy for a 220 gallon fish tank which will be filled with live rock, sand, corals and fish. My question is will I have a problem load on my laminate flooring. My home is only 3 years old and it is built with a 4' crawl space underneath. i plan on positioning the tank next to a wall in living room. Hope to hear from you soon
    Lisa

  2. #2
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
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    I have a 240g saltwater reef system, but 1/2 of that is the sump & grow out tank in the basement. Plan on about 10 lbs per gallon with all equipment.
    So about 2,200 lbs
    Is there support directly under that wall?
    If not you will need to install support
    Best support is when joists run perpendicular to the wall/tank

    I have multiple circuits & multiple GFCI's to power my tank
    Multiple smaller heaters instead of 1 heater
    Dual pump/water circulation system to keep water moving

    Fresh water or saltwater setup?
    DIY Handyman (not 4 hire)
    I have enough to do to my own house

  3. #3

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    Thanks Dave
    i will need to get under the house and see. This is starting to make me a little nervous. It is going to be salt water and also a refugium and sump under tank as well. If there is not actual directly under that wall in crawl space are you saying you would have a carpenter some in and install extra support in crawl space area. Sorry, you are talking to a female here with not a lot of carpentry experience.
    Lisa

  4. #4
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
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    Yes - you need direct support under that tank
    If your crawl space is insulated with zero chance of freezing then you can probably just have a small cement "footer" poured & support beam/posts installed as needed. It all depends upon which way the joists run. I cut my wall down part way & then built the stand for my 125g out of 4x4 PT, 2x & 2x6 supports. Its built to withstand a lot of weight. Better to overbuild then underbuild. You never want to wake up to a leaking tank. Mines been setup over 5 years now
    You also need to account or everyone at a party that maybe standing around staring at the tank

    In my addition I added a set of 12" LVL's specifically to carry the weight of my new 300g tank

    DIY Handyman (not 4 hire)
    I have enough to do to my own house

  5. #5

    Default salt water tank

    Hi dave I was looking for information on setting up my salt water tank plumbing in the basement and I found your page could you please help me with this. And I would like to know do you dive in the water off boston area?

    Tanks john

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by budlight View Post
    . And I would like to know do you dive in the water off boston area?

    Tanks john
    I always felt that going under the water for fun was in the same category as jumping out of an airplane that was not on fire!!

    Now put me in a nuclear submarine at several hundred feet , I'm in hog heaven!

  7. #7

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    Dave you got any problems keeping the snail population down?
    Last edited by Cookie; 04-24-2009 at 03:14 AM.

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    Homeowner Thatguy's Avatar
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    220 x 8.3 = 1830 pounds, just for the water. If the footprint for the tank is 8 sq. ft. then you have >230 pounds per sq. ft., dead load.
    Too high.

    I recommend taking a peek at
    http://www.amazon.com/Basic-Lumber-E.../dp/1572180420
    or some book like it. Maybe you can get it through interlibrary loan.

    And, you could measure the difference in floor deflection under the tank with the tank empty and then 1/8th full to see how much reinforcement you need. If the joists are at right angles to the wall the max deflection will probably be at midspan rather than directly under the tank.
    http://www.timber.org.au/ewebeditpro..._floor2(1).jpg
    http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/pubs/cbd/cbd054_e.html

    Post photos.
    Last edited by Thatguy; 04-12-2009 at 06:12 PM.

  9. #9
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo View Post
    I always felt that going under the water for fun was in the same category as jumping out of an airplane that was not on fire!!

    Now put me in a nuclear submarine at several hundred feet , I'm in hog heaven!
    I have a very specific reason I dive in the Boston area:


    On vacation there are other reasons:





    DIY Handyman (not 4 hire)
    I have enough to do to my own house

  10. #10
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by budlight View Post
    Hi dave I was looking for information on setting up my salt water tank plumbing in the basement and I found your page could you please help me with this. And I would like to know do you dive in the water off boston area?

    Tanks john
    What are you trying to setup?
    That would help
    I have dual drains from my 125g tank
    Either drain can almost fully plug & the other drain can handle my return pump



    This is a 45g sump, I added on a 75g tank later
    I'm taking down the 75g tank & replacing the sump with a 130g sump
    I have a 55g drum in the basement, make RO/DI water
    I then mixup saltwater & do my water changes in the basement
    My skimmer is also in the basement

    DIY Handyman (not 4 hire)
    I have enough to do to my own house

  11. #11
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thatguy View Post
    220 x 8.3 = 1830 pounds, just for the water. If the footprint for the tank is 8 sq. ft. then you have >230 pounds per sq. ft., dead load.

    And, you could measure the difference in floor deflection under the tank with the tank empty and then 1/8th full to see how much reinforcement you need. If the joists are at right angles to the wall the max deflection will probably be at midspan rather than directly under the tank.

    Post photos.
    You want to build the support BEFORE the tank is full, NOT after
    A 220g is usually 6'x2' = 12 sq ft. = 152 lbs per sq ft
    Still a lot of weight, which is why you need to build support 1st
    I do not knwo anyone who has a large tank who waited until the tank was full to add support

    Quote Originally Posted by Cookie View Post
    Dave you got any problems keeping the snail population down?
    I had snails they because a pest. Live coral you got there? what about sea urchins? I like the pencils. What do you all got in there?

    I had yellow tangs, lions, puffers, damels, i can't remember all that i had. but Otto was the greatest, a vulgarian octopus, he lived longer than expected in captivity, and if i knew to up his tank size would still be alive , well, maybe not now, he might be, in an zoo though.
    No, no problems keeping the snail population down
    Especially when I had a sharp nosed puffer, he liked escargo
    Yellow tang, powder blue tang, sailfin tang, hippo tang, damsHELLs, different species of clown fish (would spawn), small starfish, small brittle stars, different shrimp

    The rhinoclowns were my favorites
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  12. #12
    Homeowner Thatguy's Avatar
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    1/8th of a tankful is a test load. You could also use one or two heavy people standing close together alongside the wall. And 12 sq. ft is a pretty big footprint, almost a distributed load. A crowded party would give you close to this kind of loading.

    Depending on the calculations and the direction of the joists, the OP might get by just by doubling the joists in the area of the tank, over part of their lengths. For a 10' joist span, you're looking for a deflection of 1/4" or less, under full load. And you need the bridging at intervals to keep the joists from wanting to twist.

    With the tank against the wall, the center of gravity for the tank would be ~1' from the wall. If the four tank supporting joists 16" OC are at right angles to the wall, there might be no measurable increase in deflection, even with a full tank. That's the best DIY solution; no modifications at all.

    If the joists are parallel to the wall, you might need to double up only one joist. The tank would straddle the wall plate and the one joist, and the wall plate is not going anywhere. The one joist would see half the 1800#, spread out over 12'. For a full load test, get 5 guys and have them stand along the joist, one every 2' or so, and watch for a max. 1/4" deflection in the joist. This test might cost you a large pizza and some beer.
    Last edited by Thatguy; 04-12-2009 at 07:33 PM.

  13. #13
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
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    A 220g saltwater reef tank, once full & corals grown out can contain $10k worth of corals & fish. It can take years to grow out the coral

    You DO NOT take chances, you build the support 1st

    My stand & support can easily hold 3x what the tank weighs
    It cost me maybe $50 on wood
    DIY Handyman (not 4 hire)
    I have enough to do to my own house

  14. #14
    Customer Service Manager Plumbing Wholesale Peanut9199's Avatar
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    Thanks Peanut, lol
    Too funny.

    I did pay 90 dollars for the small octopus, years ago, the tangs were about 20 to 44.

    I found this picture on the site you posted here, and found this picture,

    Last edited by Cookie; 04-24-2009 at 03:19 AM.

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