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Thread: tying into galvanized plumbing with PVC

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  1. #1

    Default tying into galvanized plumbing with PVC

    My house is about 80 years old and is full of galvanized plumbing that for the most part is in pretty good condition. Alot of this plumbing leads to nowhere though, which for this project is very convenient. Im looking to put a laundry sink in my basement and the hot and cold water pipes both have pipes that lead off of them and are capped at the ends. Im wanting to tie into these and us PVC to plumb my sink. They are 3/4" dia. and that caps look fairly new. Does anyone have any advice for doing this?

  2. #2
    DIY Member msgale's Avatar
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    Default how many yrs old is the galvanized?

    The external look of the cap is not what counts, rather, the internal diameter of the galv. pipe.
    Is it mostly closed off by rust?

    try removing the cap and see how heavy a flow you have.
    But, be careful, if it's very old galv, it might just collapse and be very difficult to get back together.

  3. #3
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Adapting galvanized to PVC is, in itself, very simple. There are a couple of other more serious concerns. First, PVC can not be used for water supply inside the home. The second problem has already be mentioned. Galvanized pipe typical has about a 40 year lifespan. It may look very good on the outside, be is almost certainly rusted and corroded on the inside which not only cuts down the water flow, it weakens the pipes and serious leaks are in your future...near future. You should be planning a complete repipe of you home ASAP. I would advise copper. A few might recommend CPVC, but it's still a plastic pipe and except where water content would be a problem with copper, I would not seriously considered it. A complete repipe job is usually too big a job for DIY.

  4. #4

    Default

    If you want to add pvc to the old pipe heres how, use a galvanized couplin and get a male pvc fitting, clean the threades on pvc with cleaner then put some pvc glue on the threades hand tighten the run pvc, everyone here may not agree but I've done it, it will work but this is after you take the cap off and make sure there is plenty of water coming from the pipe, this is my personal opinion based on what i have done, If someone here does not agree please keep your rude comments to yourself, you ask what would work with this and this will work

  5. #5
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    There's no argument that this will couple galvanized to PVC and as long as we throw out code books and not concern ourselves with the wisdom of using 80 year old galvanized pipe, this is a perfect answer.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default Pvc

    Now all we have to do is addess the problem of using PVC for ANY hot water piping, PVC inside a building, and the tendency of PVC male adapters to snap off at the threads, and then we can have a system, not a good system, but a system, nevertheless.

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