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Thread: PEX replumb

  1. #1
    DIY Member chipshot's Avatar
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    Default PEX replumb

    Soon I am going to replace all the galvanized pipes in my house and originally intended on using a combination of copper and PEX. My water heater is in the attic and I had planned on using 3/4 copper from the main and up and back from the water heater and then branch out with PEX supply lines. I just figured that would be best becuase that is what was done by the plumber who re plumbed everthing in a friends remodel project. Is there any great advantage to this or would PEX be suitable for the vertical pipes that go back and forth from the attic inside the walls. Either way I will be removing the drywall where the pipes would be while re doing my luandry room.

    I realize copper is generally preferred but this is just a starter house that will either be sold or rented out in a few years. Anything would be better than the hodge podge of pipes I have right now.

  2. #2
    DIY Member chipshot's Avatar
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    bump


    anyone?

  3. #3
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    If it were mine, I'd use PEX everywhere I could run it. And I'd run it in homeruns, not branched, without getting into the walls where I could snake it through. I'd cut and support but leave the galvanized in the walls. But then I'm not a plumber.

    Gary
    Quality Water Associates

  4. #4
    DIY Member chipshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser
    If it were mine, I'd use PEX everywhere I could run it. And I'd run it in homeruns, not branched, without getting into the walls where I could snake it through. I'd cut and support but leave the galvanized in the walls. But then I'm not a plumber.

    Gary
    Quality Water Associates
    Thanks for the input. What do you mean by homeruns?

    **edit: interesting**
    Last edited by chipshot; 06-20-2005 at 05:32 PM.

  5. #5
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Home run in plumbing means one line from the source to each fixture - no branches or t-fittings. You bring the supply to a manifold, then run a line to each thing from there.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #6
    DIY Member chipshot's Avatar
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    Would that not minimize the advantages of the larger main lines considering you would have longer runs of 1/2" supply lines?

  7. #7
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    With no elbows, t's, etc. the flow has few restrictions. I'm not a pro, so take that in stride. If you go to one of the manufacturer's websites, I'm sure it is discussed.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  8. #8

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    I had some plumbers out to quote me the price of replacing my galvanized pipe with something more modern. Both of the plumbers stated that they would use PEX for the remodel work. They said that they prefer to use copper for new construction and PEX as replacement pipe. PEX is also pretty safe to work with in older homes because there are no flames and no fumes.

    You shouldn't have any trouble running PEX vertically.

    The reason I didn't use PEX is the high initial cost of the tool to crimp the ends. I could purchase all the copper pipe, parts, accessories, and lunch for the day for less than the cost of the crimp tool.
    If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.
    --Red Green

  9. #9
    DIY Member chipshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by InspectorGadget

    The reason I didn't use PEX is the high initial cost of the tool to crimp the ends. I could purchase all the copper pipe, parts, accessories, and lunch for the day for less than the cost of the crimp tool.
    I bit the bullet and purchased some off of ****. I hired a plumber for a bathroom remodel and he left the supply line for the toilet with a plug instead of a valve. It was cheaper to get the tools than have him come back. I knew I would be doing the rest of the house myself soon anyway. I ended up tearing out all of his work and redoing the tub supply pipes with copper anyway. He used PEX and didn't brace it so the fixture was not firm against the shower wall.

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