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Thread: Gas line for Fireplace

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  1. #1
    Engineering Technician The old college try's Avatar
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    Default Gas line for Fireplace

    I'm hoping someone can tell me if homeowners can run their own gas lines within a house (from existing service) or if it's necessary to hire a licensed pro. My dad (in Canada) used to have an industrial gas ticket and would be a good resource for me, but he's not familiar with U.S. laws or codes. If it's not possible, who would be the best choice to hire (Plumber???) to have it run for the lowest cost. It would simply involve removing a 1/2" line that runs across my house to a gas range and replacing it with a larger line that could service both the range and a free standing gas fireplace. The gas line is exposed and runs along the basement ceiling, so it's easily accessed. Also, do I need to hire a licensed pro to install the fireplace or can I do that myself as well? Doesn't seem too complicated, but I want to go by the book.

    Thanks in advance for any advice.

  2. #2
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
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    This may depend upon where you live
    It's been my experience that a licensed Pro is required
    At least in MA
    Where are you located?
    DIY Handyman (not 4 hire)
    I have enough to do to my own house

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    There is no hard and fast rule, even within a single state. A licensed pro is usually required for commercial work and on multifamiliy homes or dwellings, but single family homes differ. Where I live, in a single familiy home, you can pull a permit and do gas work. Now, whether that is prudent or not is anohter issue altogether.

    Iron pipe is one thing, but some of the newer materials would allow you do to it with no intermediary connections, as the stuff comes in long rolls; but, you can't buy it without being certified and having a license.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Engineering Technician The old college try's Avatar
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    I'm in Michigan. I guess I'll do a little searching around.. maybe check with the Village inspector. Thanks for the replies.

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    In most of California, and in some other states, homeowners ARE allowed to pull a permit and do plumbing work, including gas. The permit will cause an inspection at the end, but inspections do not always guarantee quality work. You are dealing with unfamiliar materials, even just the black pipe....you do not have all the tools, and unlike any other plumbing work you may have done, you will find you need larger wrenches. You will also need a test rig and a method to isolate and pressurize your piping for the inspection.

    We will answer your questions here, but do consider maybe having this one done by a licensed plumber.

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    Remodel Contractor GabeS's Avatar
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    Don't forget that licensed plumbers are also insured should something go wrong. Your house is usually your biggest assest. If a plumber blows up your house, at least you get paid. If you do, well all you'll own is a pile of rubble.
    Gabe

    Don't follow my advice, I only know a thing or two about a thing or two.

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    Engineering Technician The old college try's Avatar
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    Understood. I have pipe wrenches, but not a pipe cutter or threader. I'd have to take pipe somewhere to have custom lengths threaded.. which is kind of a pain. I'm not set on doing it myself... I'm just like anyone else in this economy.. trying to save money if I can do it safely.

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    DIY Junior Member jimmyangst's Avatar
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    to run these appliances concurrently isn't a 1/2" line sufficient?!

    It would simply involve removing a 1/2" line that runs across my house to a gas range and replacing it with a larger line that could service both the range and a free standing gas fireplace.


    You might be best off just installing a T to service the fireplace, I doubt it will need a larger supply, but I'm not a plumber or even a pot-smokin h-vac guy!

    What's the max input on both devices? (I think input #s may be harder to find as everyone yaks about output BTU; difference may be important...) I strongly suspect your 1/2" line is enough to supply both quite adequately.

    J

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