(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 54 of 54

Thread: Insulating old house

  1. #46
    DIY Senior Member Master Brian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    368

    Default

    I want to thank everyone for their input on this. I am still awaiting a response from a closed-cell DIY company, but after speaking with a good friend whom has built hundreds of houses in the area and after speaking with the local housing inspection office, I am pretty sure I am going forward with the cellulose.

    I just spoke with an inspector whom said he's been around a long time and has never seen any issues with blowing cellulose into these older houses in Kansas or even Oklahoma. I'm in the southern part of Kansas, 30-40miles from Oklahoma.

    My friend, is a licensed contractor, but he admitted he wasn't the one to ask about the insulation, but did offer that he's never seen it be a problem either.

    I can totally see where this might be a big issue in certain parts of the country or even in Canada, where the temps are more extreme and/or more humid. In any case, I will try to look behind some fiberglass batting that was installed in the early 90's, I believe, and see if I see any signs of issues before I progress with this. If none are found, I'll likely progress once the weather warms up.

    I do believe the foam is better, but it's also 4 times as expensive and I think it would be 10x the work! If anyone has any other pointers, they will be appreciated. The plan is to pull off a row of siding just below the windows, then blow in from there, then pull a row off about 3-4' higher and repeat, going up until the wall is filled. Maybe the next time I paint, I'll pull a row off and check everything to make sure there is no rot and also top off any that settles.

    Thanks again, I just wanted to pass along, what I found out from the office of central inspection.....

  2. #47
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,446

    Default

    The foam would flow into areas you may not get to blow in cellulose. It might also strengthen the structure, possibly an issue if you have earthquakes or are subject to hurricanes. It would likely provide less air intrusion, which has both good and bad issues. It has a higher R-factor. It would be a major pain if you even needed to run new electric or plumbing through the wall! So, you probably get what you pay for. Utility costs are only likely to continue to go up.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #48
    Remodel Contractor GabeS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    294

    Default

    Don't mean to hijack this thread, but my Dad's house has no insulation in the walls.

    Plaster and lath walls, won't be doing any demo. It has tar paper as an air barrier but don't know what kind of condition it's in. The house is about 70 years old. True 2x4 framing.

    What would be the best way to insulate it from the inside. Can you used closed cell foam by only drilling holes?
    Gabe

    Don't follow my advice, I only know a thing or two about a thing or two.

  4. #49
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,446

    Default

    Foam can be injected...you typically need at least two holes in each stud bay, and more if there are fire blocks closing them off part way. The general procedure is to insert it in one hole low and look for it eventually (you need the slow expanding stuff) to reach the upper hole. Lots of holes to patch, but I suppose if you used a good hole saw, you could reuse the plugs. Follow the instructions of the product you choose.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #50
    Remodel Contractor GabeS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    294

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    Foam can be injected...you typically need at least two holes in each stud bay, and more if there are fire blocks closing them off part way. The general procedure is to insert it in one hole low and look for it eventually (you need the slow expanding stuff) to reach the upper hole. Lots of holes to patch, but I suppose if you used a good hole saw, you could reuse the plugs. Follow the instructions of the product you choose.

    That's good news. It can be done. So, is the only downside of using closed cell foam the fact that you can't fish wires or pipes through afterward? I have remodeling and construction experience with kitchens and bathrooms, do you think doing this the first time is doable without overfilling and breaking the walls, or should it be left to a pro? Also, I'm guessing the foam would expand out of the holes and could then be cut flush with the wall?
    Gabe

    Don't follow my advice, I only know a thing or two about a thing or two.

  6. #51
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,446

    Default

    Pick the right foam, and you should be okay.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #52
    DIY Junior Member khali's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    5

    Default polyurethane spray,protective coatings

    I have applied polyurethane foam for insulation my home.. There are two types of spray foam insulation: open cell and closed cell. Closed cell insulation typically has a higher R-value, so you get more bang for your buck. Spray foam insulation is expensive and durable. The product is more expensive inch for inch, and requires installation by a professional. It's sprayed in your walls as a liquid, then expands and hardens. Spray foam insulation is great because it fills every little nook and cranny creating an air tight seal. It doesn't biode grade, so once installed it will be there for the life of your home. It also doesn't shrink or settle. Spray foam is a great option if you're sealing small spaces like outlets, around window frames, and doorways. Choose best spray foam-e.gultimate linings, qwikliner , xtreme liners etc.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by khali; 04-28-2010 at 12:17 AM.

  8. #53
    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,172

    Default

    Actually, there's a lot more to this and you guys are making out.

    khali, the picture you posted is of a HALF POUND (per cubic foot) density spray applied foam, it is the cheaper, less effective of the two.

    The other option is TWO POUND (per cubic foot) density spray foam, when you spray apply this it expands within seconds, not minutes, and if the guy using the gun knows what he is doing you wont need to do the ridiculous amount of trimming that half-pound foam requires.



    That is a finished product after spraying 2 pound density foam, it doesn't expand in huge plumes and can provide R7 per inch.

    Half pound foam is junk.

    Neither of them can be installed in any large volume by a home owner, it's never going to be feasible to try to buy little cans, or propane bottle diy kits and do an entire house, this is a job for PROFESSIONALS.

  9. #54
    DIY Junior Member khali's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    5

    Red face polyurethane foam

    Spray foam insulation is a polyurethane foam that is pumped into your home so that your walls, ceilings, will be insulated well. This type of insulation will help you to keep the cold outside during winter and help keep the heat out during the summer months. After all no one wants to be too hot or too cold. At one point only trained professionals could do this. Now they have the do it yourself kits.Today many company providing polyurethane foam e.g ultimate linings,qwikliner etc.I have applied ultimate linings polyurethane foam for the last 15 yrs.It's result amazing.
    Last edited by khali; 04-28-2010 at 12:20 AM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •