(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 29

Thread: need second opinion- safe elec. heater install

  1. #1

    Default need second opinion- safe elec. heater install

    Hi guys, hoping someone here can help me out a bit.

    I just was given a really nice electric heater, like as seen here:
    http://www.heatersplus.com/5100.htm

    I have a PDF version of that page that is easier to read, and it states that my model number is 208 volts, 1 or 3 phase, 60hz. Some of the other models can be switched from 208 to 240, mine cannot. lucky me.

    Here's where I really did myself in, I had mistaken the part number of my unit for one that is 240 switchable, so when I got paid today I went and spent some big bucks on 6 gauge wire and a 50 amp breaker hoping to install it.

    Then I double checked the model number and of course realized I have the 208v model.

    I have been doing a lot of reading and I have only confused myself, but what I am thinking is that I cannot make 208v from my residential breaker box.

    There is not much to this heater. Its got a small transformer, 24v control system, a fan and a coil. It is controlled by a wall mounted thermostat.

    I am wondering, if I connect this thing to 220 or 240 or whatever it is coming out of my box, will it work, and will it be safe? I am afraid to burn my house down, but at the same time I just spent all my money on wire and thermostat and it's not getting any warmer in here..

    I have run new 110v circuits in the past, and added an electric dryer circuit to the house. I am confident I can handle the install, I am just concerned for the safety of my family.

    Any answers will be appreciated-

    cold in indiana

  2. #2
    DIY Junior Member jamiedolan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by frostnip View Post
    Hi guys, hoping someone here can help me out a bit.

    I just was given a really nice electric heater, like as seen here:
    http://www.heatersplus.com/5100.htm

    I have a PDF version of that page that is easier to read, and it states that my model number is 208 volts, 1 or 3 phase, 60hz. Some of the other models can be switched from 208 to 240, mine cannot. lucky me.

    Here's where I really did myself in, I had mistaken the part number of my unit for one that is 240 switchable, so when I got paid today I went and spent some big bucks on 6 gauge wire and a 50 amp breaker hoping to install it.

    Then I double checked the model number and of course realized I have the 208v model.

    I have been doing a lot of reading and I have only confused myself, but what I am thinking is that I cannot make 208v from my residential breaker box.

    There is not much to this heater. Its got a small transformer, 24v control system, a fan and a coil. It is controlled by a wall mounted thermostat.

    I am wondering, if I connect this thing to 220 or 240 or whatever it is coming out of my box, will it work, and will it be safe? I am afraid to burn my house down, but at the same time I just spent all my money on wire and thermostat and it's not getting any warmer in here..

    I have run new 110v circuits in the past, and added an electric dryer circuit to the house. I am confident I can handle the install, I am just concerned for the safety of my family.

    Any answers will be appreciated-

    cold in indiana
    There is no practical way to change your 240v service to 208v. I strongly suggest you do not hook up that unit as is.

    I would either get the correct heater. Or speak directly with the tech department at the heater company and discuss the situation with them to see if there is a field modification that can be done to convert the unit to 240.

    EDIT: When I said field modification; I was thinking along the lines of the company sending out a tech to make a factory authorized change.

    Jamie
    Last edited by jamiedolan; 01-07-2009 at 02:02 PM. Reason: clarification

  3. #3
    Code Enforcement codeone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    160

    Default

    You could install a transformer to do the conversion However it would be costly. Correct size to handle the load. Probably not worth it. and unsightly. If you modify the unit you would be altering the UL Listing. Your insurance Probably not pay if anything happened. Be safe not sorry.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by codeone View Post
    You could install a transformer to do the conversion However it would be costly. Correct size to handle the load. Probably not worth it. and unsightly. If you modify the unit you would be altering the UL Listing. Your insurance Probably not pay if anything happened. Be safe not sorry.
    I agree with you, I just needed to hear it from someone else for it to sink in. Your logic plays tricks on you when your house is cold.


    I have a PDF file that shows this same heater with an additional letter in the model number, it is the voltage selectable unit. In the same file are all the part numbers, and there are 4 different parts in the 240v model.

    they are: motor, element, contactor, and power block. Sounds like it would cost me an arm and leg to convert it over. I sent them an email, we'll see.

    http://www.markel-products.com/01-Me...scharge/om.pdf

    The heater I have is f2f5107CA1L, the one I want has a very similar number with a B in it..

  5. #5

    Default

    still getting conflicting info.

    My friend's dad says to hook it up and quit being a pansy. He says I don't need a 240v model and that my breaker box won't even put out 240. He said I would be safer with this one than a 240 model.

    He said 2 110 hots don't even put out 220 and hooking up the 208v heater to a double 50A breaker is fine.

    He told me to connect to the single phase connections of the heater and it will work fine, citing some sort of 10% rule....

  6. #6
    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Litchfield, CT
    Posts
    608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by frostnip View Post
    still getting conflicting info.

    My friend's dad says to hook it up and quit being a pansy. He says I don't need a 240v model and that my breaker box won't even put out 240. He said I would be safer with this one than a 240 model.

    He said 2 110 hots don't even put out 220 and hooking up the 208v heater to a double 50A breaker is fine.

    He told me to connect to the single phase connections of the heater and it will work fine, citing some sort of 10% rule....
    Well than that settles it. Wire it up.

  7. #7

    Default

    I am with your friend's dad. Generally it is 208/240....whatever it takes.

    I saw it listed as 208/240 somewhere in your link.

    Anyway, I rarely see a piece of equipment that is 208 or 240 only. I have seen some electronic stuff that is sensitive.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris75 View Post
    Well than that settles it. Wire it up.
    I just keep coming to this same spot- assuming I can pull "220" off my breaker board, what could 12 extra volts possibly hurt? Would the coil make a lil more heat or the fan turn a couple more RPM? Maybe the transformer will grenade under the extra 12 volts?


    I am thinking about a trial run in the basement. wire it up without the wire ran through the wall, see what happens.

  9. #9
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    9,001

    Default

    A heating element rated for 208 , if you run at 240 of course it will draw more amps. As long as the breaker and wire are rated, that is OK. But you would need to know from the maker if they condsider it OK to run their unit at 240.

  10. #10
    DIY Junior Member jamiedolan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by frostnip View Post
    still getting conflicting info.

    My friend's dad says to hook it up and quit being a pansy. He says I don't need a 240v model and that my breaker box won't even put out 240. He said I would be safer with this one than a 240 model.

    He said 2 110 hots don't even put out 220 and hooking up the 208v heater to a double 50A breaker is fine.

    He told me to connect to the single phase connections of the heater and it will work fine, citing some sort of 10% rule....
    He obviously doesn't even understand very basic electrical concepts.

    I just checked with the manufacture and some of these units are dual rated 208/240 and are convertible. That does not mean you can hook it up as it.

    Jamie

  11. #11

  12. #12
    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY and Fire Island, NY
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    Hey, I could be wrong, and I'm no sparky, but

    It is important that the rated voltage of the heating equipement match the supply voltage. Supply voltage in excess of the heater rated voltage can damage equipement.
    ...seems pretty clear to me.



    ...edit:

    Sure enough - I googled, iff you download the catalog & specs, look at page 2... it's not only the motor that's different, it's also the element.

    http://www.markel-products.com/01-Me...charge/cat.pdf.
    Last edited by frenchie; 01-07-2009 at 04:10 PM.
    Master Plumber Mark:

    there is nothing better than the
    manly smell of WD 40 in the air
    while banging away on brass with a chisel and hammer...

    it smells like......victory......

    do not hit your thumb...
    __________________
    Just so everyone's clear: I'm the POODLE in the picture ("french", get it?) The hot woman is my wife.

  13. #13
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    South of Boston, MA
    Posts
    885

    Default

    I've checked my "110" output & I have between 118 & 122 on any given day. Wiring it up in the basement it may run fine
    Permanently hooked up it could run fine for a year, 5 years or longer
    Then one day that one part that just isn't rated for 240v burns up, starts a fire & burns your house down. Then insurance finds a 208v heater connected to 240v & claim denied

    Is it worth that possibility?
    They use different parts for a reason
    DIY Handyman (not 4 hire)
    I have enough to do to my own house

  14. #14
    DIY Senior Member thassler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Lmao!! -->
    Quote Originally Posted by chris75 View Post
    well than that settles it. Wire it up. :d

  15. #15

    Default

    Why do you even need an opinion on this.

    It is not rated for the nominal voltage of your service. This would be a non-compliant, illegal and usafe installation and you need to return it for the correct voltage.

    In addition, you need to know what model you have so that you can properly rate the circuit. The tag on the unit of proper voltage will tell you that.

    Your friend's dad is giving horrible advice and I highly recommend you return the unit for the correct voltage. Your unit is not designed the voltage at your service.

    Seems like an easy, logical answer. Unless of course you are waiting for someone to tell you what you want to hear like a lot of people who post here.

    I hope you pull a permit and get the work inspected.
    http://www.inspectpa.com/forum/forum.php
    My answers are based mostly on the ICC codes. Advice given is my personal opinion and every person performing work should acquire a permit from his/her jurisdiction and get the work inspected. My opinions are not directions to follow for DIYs or professionals

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •