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Thread: Shower tap question

  1. #1

    Default Shower tap question

    Hello,

    I got a question for you. I have a shower tap that is one tap. You pull it up to turn the water on...pull it to the right for cold water and right for hot. When you pull it up..the water is a little cold and then you move it slowly to the right...its get really hot...I am simply trying to get a nice mixture of warm water...not to super hot..and not to cold.

    When Like my water to be hot, but not burning hot to the skin...so when i move it about about less then 1/32 of an inch...the water get cold...there is no control or balance of the mixture.

    IS there something wrong with the tap?
    help.

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by monstar147 View Post
    Hello,

    I got a question for you. I have a shower tap that is one tap. You pull it up to turn the water on...pull it to the right for cold water and right for hot. When you pull it up..the water is a little cold and then you move it slowly to the right...its get really hot...I am simply trying to get a nice mixture of warm water...not to super hot..and not to cold.

    When Like my water to be hot, but not burning hot to the skin...so when i move it about about less then 1/32 of an inch...the water get cold...there is no control or balance of the mixture.

    IS there something wrong with the tap?
    help.
    On the opposite side of the wall (possibly in a closet), there should be a removable panel. Inside, there should be shut-off valves for hot and cold water. If not there, then maybe in basement.

    Try adjusting the cold water valve (turn toward off) to equalize the flow of hot and cold if hot valve is open wider than cold.

    Or, mixing valve may be defective.


    V
    Last edited by veesubotee; 12-16-2008 at 01:53 PM. Reason: add info

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Sep 2004
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    New England
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    21,397

    Default

    That type of valve can be fixed, but it may be best to consider replacing it. It will be easier when you sell the house, and will protect the occupants until that happens. The reason is all newly installed valves must meet US Federal guidelines which require anti-scald technology. Your valve, from you description of how it works, is unlikely to have those features now required.

    My guess is that the cartridge needs to be replaced if you want to repair it (which is legal as it's grandfathered). I'd still consider replacing it, though. Depending on how handy you are, you can replace the cartridge. If you can't, by the time you pay a plumber, it shouldn't be all that much more to replace it with new. Depends on where you live and the valve you decide you want to select.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Aug 2004
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    Cave Creek, Arizona
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    25,633

    Default cost

    I can repair a valve for a lot less than it would cost to replace it.

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