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Thread: Tankless or tank water heater

  1. #16
    DIY Member willl's Avatar
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    I think that that rheem model was direct as it requires an intake of either pvc pipe etc. to the outside.

    It is amazing how many articles there are on these and most of them seem to be biased. Rheem makes both tank and tankless so perhaps what they say is more credible and they did do a writing on there website to give alittle comparison on both. http://www.smarterhotwater.com http://waterheating.rheem.com/conten...ss.shtml.shtml are some good places. They do mention that tankless heaters are more popular worldwide like in europe but of course that is because energy costs elsewhere are different than in the usa.

    I probably should check to even see if installing one of these tankless is even possible in my situation. Thanks

  2. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladiesman271 View Post
    Do you get the so called "cold water sandwich" with that unit? Does the burner kick on right away, or is there a time delay (like 5 or so seconds) after you turn on the water?
    Burner kicks on and modulates to the flow rate based on demand. I have observed an additional 5 to 8 seconds of additional water flow at the start of a shower to get the "hot" water after changing our house from a 50 gallon gas water heater. No big deal to me. Have not had an issue with any form of "cold water sandwich". I am a happy user of a great tankless system. I did my research into all those "issues" out there.... including gas line sizing. It all worked for me in my situation.
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  3. #18
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    What temperature is the heater set for? Unless you are trying to fill the spa with water that temperature, 85 gallons should just about do the job. The 199 heater will recover at 3 or 4 times the rate of your 85 gallon one, but the 100 gallon storage should be enough of an increase by itself. It is a commercial water heater and therefore, by definition, it probably only has a 3 year warranty.

  4. #19
    DIY Member willl's Avatar
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    Hello Hj, heater is set at 170 degrees (highest setting) on the 85 gallon electrical unit. About half way into filling the water in the tub starts getting to a temp that is not good. Like these tank hot water heaters work when you start emptying the tank more cold tap water enters into the tank decreasing the temparature of the water in the tank. Not good for my situation. To be safe I would have to get another 100 gallon or 120 gallon besides the 85 gallon I already have and then hook them up together. Thanks

  5. #20
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Something doesn't seem to compute...I'm assuming you have a tempering valve on the output. You might want to raise the tempered output slightly, but even at the normal 120-degree setting, you should get enough to fill the tub. You should get 85% of the capacity IF the upper element is working properly. Mix that with enough cold water so you can stand to sit in the tub, and it should be enough, whether you temper it at the tank (safer) or at the tub.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #21

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    That's why I told the OP to measure the water temperature with a thermometer. Just because the thermostat is set to 170 does not mean he has 170 degree water at the tub.

    He may not even have 170 at the water heater. If he has a tempering valve, it could be set low or it could even be bad.

    Measure the water temperature, don't guess!

  7. #22
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    A bad tempering valve can always be mixing in more cold than it should. If you have one, it's hard to actually test the tanks output. You could do it with a contact thermometer after running the water a bit to heat up the pipe, but normally you wouldn't have a tap before the tempering valve.

    If you feel the in, cold, out branches of the tempering valve, they should be at radically different temperatures if you have it set to 170, and it really is there. I'd never run a WH that high without a tempering valve...too dangerous. Raising the tank's temp does give you more capacity at normal temperatures, but the recovery time is extended quite a bit.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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