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Thread: American Standard Glenwall wall mount toilet and Yorkville review

  1. #16
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    A/S must be treating all their wholesalers as if they were Home Depot.

  2. #17
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    A/S must be treating all their wholesalers as if they were Home Depot.
    Maybe.
    In the last year or so, I've had many more defects with American Standard then I'm used to.
    And like you hj, I'm only buying from the normal wholesale outfits reserved for plumbers.
    Last edited by Terry; 07-01-2010 at 08:35 AM.

  3. #18
    DIY Junior Member MerryWidow's Avatar
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    Question HELP! Need Wall-Mount Toilet Replacement Advice

    First time poster here!

    I purchased a 1964 bi-level home (that was still stuck in hippy 1964, green shag & all but high quality construction materials). Most of the '60's decor is gone (except for the still functioning, quirky, center front door knob) and now I'm ready to begin remodeling/gutting two bathrooms.

    Both upstairs baths have the original, wall-mounted, American Standard toilets and are located over finished basement. Technically, both toilets 'function' but I just can't get the bowls clean and my 17 yo son clogs them very regularly (my lecture for 'more fiber' falls on deaf ears!).

    I spoke with my local Lowe's rep and he says that I can go back with Am. Standard but their rep's response to problems is about non-existent. He says the Kohler rep is great though plus their products are 'made in America'. The product he recommended was a Kohler tankless unit but said I'd need to replace with a 1" water line which I really don't want to do since I'd have to tear out about 30' of the downstairs ceiling to access the second bath (upstairs is all original hardwood flooring). Also, the well pump is showing 40 PSI and he said the toilets would need 60 PSI. So, to me, it just makes more sense to go back to toilets with tanks.

    I'm in desperate need of your expert advice and opinions in non-technical terms please! However, there are a few issues that might reduce my selection (be it Kohler or another brand). First, I'm on well water with 3/8" (I think) copper pipes going between the floors and the water supply feeds straight uphill to the space between the floors. Second, the waste pipe to the septic system (no sewer) is old cast iron. Of the two toilets, one has a wall behind it that can be opened; however, the second has a window above. Lastly, the dishwasher, kitchen sink and washing machine do not feed into the septic so there's little water, except for the bath sinks and shower to push 'things' along. A no-no, yes, but the Health Department let it be grandfathered (and I'm careful not to harm the ground water environment).

    I've read a lot on this site but much is still Greek to me. Basically, I want to replace with new wall-mount units that are quiet, aren't $1K+ in cost, and will handle my son's 'lack of fiber'.

    I'll also have to find a plumber to install since the company I've been using says they 'don't do commercial' and consider wall-mount toilets to be 'commercial'. Looks like they'll be losing a customer!

    All opinions and recommendations are welcomed and appreciated!

    Karen

  4. #19
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    I am only recommending the American Standard Glenwall if you have a 60's wall hung to replace.
    The bolt pattern is the same, and they are not that hard to install.
    Just make sure you keep and reuse the bolt caps, or you will find yourself at the hardware store looking for washers and nuts.

    When you pick up your replacement Glenwall, also get a neoprene seal for it.

    You can't install a Flushometer valve in a home without either replacing the meter, water service and most of your cold water piping, or installing an expansion tank near the toilet that can provide an instant 2.0 gallon surge.

    The Glenwall has the tank built in, and can feed with your house pressure 3/8" feed.
    It's a no brainer!


    American Standard Glenwall toilet
    Last edited by Terry; 05-14-2010 at 03:53 PM.

  5. #20
    DIY Junior Member MNI's Avatar
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    Default 2010 A/S Glenwall on a 60's Glenwall carrier?

    Can anyone confirm (or deny) that a 2010 American Standard Glenwall toilet will fit on the existing carrier for a mid 60's era Glenwall toilet? Please no guesses here; I'd like to hear from a plumber who has done a swap out on the existing carrier (or not). Thanks very much. We haven't examined the carrier yet.



    This is a stanard Residential Carrier from Mifab.
    Most home from the 60's with wall hung bowls have something like this.
    Last edited by Terry; 10-07-2013 at 03:48 PM.

  6. #21
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Glenwall toilets in the Seattle area
    Terry Love, 206-949-5683

    New Glenwall on a 60's mount.
    Last edited by Terry; 01-10-2014 at 10:44 AM.

  7. #22
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    The only reason I would "retire" a Case 3000/3100 would be if it was cracked or I got tired of its color. The carrier in the wall is already a 4 bolt pattern, which only used the portion necessary for the Case.

  8. #23
    DIY Junior Member Te0TBP's Avatar
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    I've got an American Standard Glenwall that was installed as part of a remodel a couple of years ago.

    It replaced a standard floor-mounted toilet because the location moved by a couple of feet. Rather than notch a floor joist for the waste line, I thought a wall mount would be nice. It's convenient when it comes time to mop the floor too...

    But I'm pretty unhappy with it.

    First, there's the flush performance. It's powerful, and usually takes care of solids, but any light material (paper or otherwise) floating on the surface of the water just gets tossed around on the surface, and often doesn't get flushed away on the first try.

    Next, there's the noise. It's loud, probably because of the volume of air the flushmate introduces. The noise isn't a "thump" as described earlier in the thread, but rather a huge spray/whoosh sound.

    I got an idea that maybe the pressure assist flush thing was required because of the possibly long in-wall horizontal run associated with a typical install. In my case, the only horizontal bit is the cast iron carrier. The waste line immediately turns down at about 30 degrees where it exits the cast iron. Maybe I could replace the flushmate with a normal mechanism?

    Imagine my disappointment to discover that all of the water blasted out of the power unit's large outlet flows through two dime-sized holes at the bowl entrance. Of course a gravity flush mechanism didn't work.

    So, I put it back together with new gaskets and now I have a leaky disaster.

    I've tried 3 different gaskets (every one they had at the orange store), and none will create a seal that stands up to the pressure produced by the flushmate unit.

    I've tightened the tank-to-bowl bolts until the tank makes contact with the bowl on all four "feet" (little standoffs between the tank and bowl), but the fit isn't tight enough.

    Whether a particular flush will produce a leak is unpredictable, but the leaks (when they come) sometimes produce as much as a quart of water blasting all over the walls!

    Ugh.

    Am I doing something wrong? I took the cartridge out, and adjusted it according to instructions I found online (install the cartridge until water stops flowing into the bowl, then ensure 1/8" clearance at the actuator)

    Is there a particular gasket I should be using? The one that came with the unit was a slightly oversize red one with a hex cut-out for the large nut on the flushmate unit, but the American Standard replacement part is black according to photos I've found online.

    Perhaps I can lower the flush power by reducing the amount air drawn in by the flushmate? The air is the "spring" that does most of the work, as I understand it.

    I've examined the bowl and tank and don't believe they're defective, just a stupid design. The tank-to-bowl gasket is under a tremendous amount of pressure because the huge blast of water (firing a charged flushmate without a toilet was pretty impressive) is forced through such tiny holes at the bowl inlet.

  9. #24
    DIY kid who loves toilets Starwarsith88's Avatar
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    Well first question is, where is the toilet leaking? Second of all, always remember that you will not be able to change to a gravity flush on any pressure assist toilet, that's the way the trap way is designed. But anyways, this might help you http://www.eflushmate.com/FP/product/E-205288.html and if you seem to still have issues, it could possibly be that the flushmate system is not working properly, and if that doesn't go smooth then your toilet is probably leaking somewhere. Good luck and hopefully the problem could be fixed!


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  10. #25
    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    Doh!

    Why would you take apart a Flushmate-equipped toilet without doing the two seconds of research on the Internet that would have been required to find 4000 articles that explained that a pressure-assist REQUIRES a different bowl than a gravity toilet (so that the water doesn't blast all over the bathroom)? Those "dime-sized holes" are what is NECESSARY for the thing to work its best.

    Why doesn't it work? I don't know. I'm guessing you broke something.

    Of course, there are a limited number of places it can leak and a limited number of potential causes. If you have the right gaskets and you put it back together correctly and you haven't cracked the porcelain, it won't leak.

    Oh, yeah. Stop messing around with it. It is what it is. You chose this solution. In this application, you really do want the Flushmate not a gravity toilet. I'm sorry that you're finding it to be too loud, but if you want a gravity toilet then your solution is a floor flange.
    Last edited by wjcandee; 08-21-2013 at 09:05 AM.

  11. #26
    DIY Junior Member Te0TBP's Avatar
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    Thanks very much for the replies!

    I sure wish I'd known about the difference in bowls before I started down this terrible road!

    I've conceded defeat on the noise front, am now trying to get things back where I started.

    The gasket that's currently in there is a fairly small one. The orange store had two "fluidmaster" options: one with a flange that surrounds the flushmate nut, and one without.

    The "without flange" gasket is currently installed.

    The leaks appear to be coming from in between the gasket and the flushmate outlet, suggesting that water is passing by the large threads on the flushmate.

    One possibility has occurred to me: I replaced the inside-the-tank gasket on the flushmate when I reassembled everything. I don't suspect that it is the direct cause of the leak (it doesn't hold pressure, afterall), but I wonder if my replacement inside-the-tank gasket isn't thinner than the original one. If that's the case, then perhaps I've got too much of the flushmate outlet protruding into the bowl, and that's interfering with the intended flow.

    I'm thinking of pulling the cartridge out and measuring the clearance between the bottom of the flushmate outlet and the bottom of the bowl's inlet.

    I take it that the only adjustments on the flushmate unit are the cartridge depth and the actuator height? There's nothing to adjust with the air inlet valve?

    Should I be tightening the tank bolts until the tank is making contact with the bowl (no rocking back and forth)?

    Is the Flushmate gasket linked by Starwarsith88 substantially different from stuff I'll find at the orange store? I've got an American Standard 034602-0070A (the one listed in the Glenwall replacement parts diagram) coming in the mail.

    Thanks again.
    Last edited by Te0TBP; 08-21-2013 at 12:33 PM.

  12. #27
    DIY Junior Member Te0TBP's Avatar
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    The American Standard gasket came in today. It's the same dimensions as the other ones I've tried, but the material is quite different.

    It's much less dense, but more rigid than the other gaskets I've tried.

    If the other ones are like gummi worms, this one is like a piece of styrofoam.

    So far, so good. No leaks yet tonight.
    Last edited by Terry; 11-18-2013 at 04:40 PM.

  13. #28
    DIY Junior Member Te0TBP's Avatar
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    The leak came back, but I think I figured it out this time.

    I'd been working under the bogus understanding that the tank-to-bowl gasket seals the flushmate outlet tube to the bowl.

    This was totally wrong. For one thing, the output tube is threaded. No way to establish a seal against that surface.

    The tank-to-bowl gasket actually creates a seal between the bowl and the face of the large (2.5"?) nut on the bottom of the flushmate.

    There's a path for pressure to escape through the threads, past the nut, then between the top of the nut and the bottom of the tank. That's what the paper gasket is for, and I think this was my problem all along.

    I wish I'd thought this through more completely the previous ten time I had it apart

    <sigh>

    Homeowners are the worst, huh?

    Thanks again.

  14. #29
    DIY Junior Member Te0TBP's Avatar
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    Another update.

    I ordered the gasket Starwarsith88 linked above.

    It's totally different from the "correct" American Standard part. Much larger and harder than the American Standard part, or any of the ones (even "oversize" ones) available at the Orange store.

    Clearly, this is the gasket that should be used in this application.

    Also, it's not clear what constitutes a defective bowl, as have been mentioned so many times in this thread, but I think I may have one.

    I had a close look at the gasket surface on the bowl. At first glance it looks okay (no obvious cracks/voids, the enamel is in nice shape), but the shape of the gasket surface is sloppy. Around most of its circumference, the gasket surface has a stair-step profile.

    At about 3:00 (the right side), the clearly-defined stair-step is deformed. It looks more like a ramp than a stair-step. This is the side that was leaking, and it makes sense that the gasket wouldn't seal well here.

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