(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20

Thread: Pressure Gauge goes over 100psi!

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member masterdiy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    10

    Unhappy Pressure Gauge goes over 100psi!

    My systems was suddenly sending high pressure water to the faucets. The pump would run to the designated 60PSI and shut off. But the pressure gauge would continue to rise past 80PSI!.
    Upon inspection I found the Well-Trol 40gal tank had seen it's better days, the bladder had burst, so I replaced it.
    After installing the new tank and bleeding off the air in the system I noticed the pump was cutting off at 55 PSI ( I lowered the cut off switch just a bit) but the gauge would continue to rise after the pump went off! Once it went farther than the gauge registered!!! Even after adjusting the pressure switch to cut on @ 38psi (the new tank says 2# under it's pressure of 40#), and cutting off at 50psi, the gauge still will continue to rise after the pump shuts off! Now, I see the contacts open and close, as well as hearing the pump actually shut off and on as I am watching the gauge. So, what the heck?
    Mystery........

  2. #2
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Lubbock, Texas
    Posts
    4,153

    Default

    Last time that happened to me, there was a buried pressure tank that no one knew about. After the pump shut off, the other pressure tank would continue to feed more pressure to the new pressure tank. It is either something like this or, the pump is not really shutting off like you think.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member masterdiy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Buried pressure tank? Wonder why would that be the case?
    I'd bet my life on the pump going off....as I look at the contacts fully disengage and I can hear the pump stop running, I'm positive the pump is off...
    I can follow the line right to the hole in the ground. There's no such thing as a pressure tank in the hole....hope no one takes an opportunity for a little fun with this one. It could turn out to be very expensive.....

  4. #4
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Land of Cheese
    Posts
    3,134

    Default

    The pump is the only thing that might be able to make that kind of pressure. Are you certain the gauge is working properly?

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member masterdiy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    10

    Default 3 stories

    Pump is off! You can hear it run and then shut off...There's no way a pump keeps running after the electricity is cut off from it and you can hear it stop running.
    So, I wonder if the two stories above the basement would have any way of building backpressure that would somehow register at the gauge? Since the plumbing (gauge, tank, and switch) are in the basement bathroom closet, I quickly open some faucets and flush a toilet when the pressure goes up over 100psi to relieve the pressure. The water does come out very strong and the gauge recedes as I let pressure off.
    Of course I get one that no one has ever heard of...typical for my diy!

  6. #6
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    The gauge may be clogged with crud causing it to lag in the readings.

  7. #7
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Land of Cheese
    Posts
    3,134

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by masterdiy View Post
    Pump is off! You can hear it run and then shut off...There's no way a pump keeps running after the electricity is cut off from it and you can hear it stop running.
    So, I wonder if the two stories above the basement would have any way of building backpressure that would somehow register at the gauge? Since the plumbing (gauge, tank, and switch) are in the basement bathroom closet, I quickly open some faucets and flush a toilet when the pressure goes up over 100psi to relieve the pressure. The water does come out very strong and the gauge recedes as I let pressure off.
    Of course I get one that no one has ever heard of...typical for my diy!
    Nope- even if the building was 5 stories high you would not get 100psi. There is nothing in a solitary well system that can develop 100 psi other that the pump.

    Any chance the home is hooked to a second water source? Sometimes people buy a house that is cross connected to an old shared well or city water and don't even know it.

  8. #8
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Land of Cheese
    Posts
    3,134

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by masterdiy View Post
    Upon inspection I found the Well-Trol 40gal tank had seen it's better days, the bladder had burst, so I replaced it.
    After installing the new tank and bleeding off the air in the system I noticed the pump was cutting off at 55 PSI ( I lowered the cut off switch just a bit) but the gauge would continue to rise after the pump went off! Once it went farther than the gauge registered!!! Even after adjusting the pressure switch to cut on @ 38psi (the new tank says 2# under it's pressure of 40#), and cutting off at 50psi, the gauge still will continue to rise......
    You have this backwards too.... your bladder tank must be set to at least 2psi less than your pump cut-in pressure. Make sure your water pressure gauge is correct. Drain your tank of water and check the air charge. (Don't assume it is right just because the tank is new. Make sure your air gauge is correct.

    If you don't have the base air and water pressures set properly, the system will not work properly.

  9. #9

    Default

    You said you have your switch set for 38/50. At some point you need to adjust that for at least a 20 lb difference to keep from shortening your pumps life.

    Hope you find the cause of your high pressure but it sounds like it may be coming from an outside source.

  10. #10
    Electrician frenchelectrican's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NE Wis / Paris France { In France now }
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Any chance you live on the hill ? if the pump is up the hill and the pressure tank / pressure switch located at lower spot .,

    If so read on .

    The gravity will push it down and make more pressure than you need to.


    The other possbilty that you have the pump quite away from the house and take a little while to get all the water move something like at the pump itself maybe running near max designed pressure and down the way the pressure gradually dropped to the house so like example at the pumphead will run at 100 PSI go a ways to the house the pressure dropped down to about 50 or so due the pipe size unless you got one of big pipe.

    And one of the reader say possiblty you got other source somewhere else if that the case and possiblty you may have bad pressure regualtor { only if ya on city water }

    Merci,marc

  11. #11
    Porky Cutter,MGWC Porky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Posts
    727

    Default You need a qualified professional!

    This sounds like a serious problem and by your description, not something a DYI should be trying to rectify.

    I recommend that you call a qualified well pump professional and advise them of your concern. They may be able to ask you the proper questions and give you a solution over the telephone or it may require their on site observation.

    Either way it sounds as though you have an unusual and serious problem.

  12. #12
    Previous member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Riverview, Fl.
    Posts
    4,540

    Default

    I have never been able to get a pressure switch to go much below a 17 lb pressure differential. You said you have it set 38/50. I doubt that; and that leads me to believe your gauge is not telling you the truth. I'm not doubting the higher pressure, just your instruments. A good tire gauge for the tank and a very good pressure gauge for your water system might be the first things to replace before any more testing is done.

    bob...

  13. #13
    DIY Junior Member masterdiy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    10

    Default new gauge?

    Can you just got to the hardware store, Lowe's or Home Depot, etc, and screw on a new gauge?
    Isn't the gauge connected somehow to the pressure switch?
    It does sound like the pressure gauge isn't reading right. I put it at 40-60 and now when it gets to 40 there is NO pressure in any faucets. Even thought the gauge shows 40psi, no water runs out of the system and the pump won't kick in for about 30 seconds...

    thanks!

  14. #14
    Previous member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Riverview, Fl.
    Posts
    4,540

    Default

    Yes you can just replace the gauge. It has nothing to do with the pressure switch. It's just an instrument to tell you what pressure is in your system.

    I'm not sure what's going on with no pressure and the pump not turning on for 30 seconds except for the possibility of a plugged pressure switch line.

    bob...

  15. #15
    DIY Junior Member masterdiy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    10

    Default

    OK, thanks. I'm going to the hdw store to get a new gauge now. Is there some way to "clean" out the switch line???

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •