(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Vent a Toilet

  1. #1

    Default Vent a Toilet

    I want to move my toilet to a different location for a remodel. It is a pretty straight shot so I will only be extending the drain pipe by about 10-12 feet which would make the new toilet about 15 feet from the stack. There are no other fixtures on the line except for another toilet in a nearby bathroom. Can someone explain what I need to consider with regard to venting? Do I need to vent the toilet or does the stack act as the vent? Is there a retrofit/remodel way to vent drain lines that is less invasive so you don't have to extend a pipe through the roof?

    Thanks for your help!

  2. #2
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akkula View Post
    ... extending the drain pipe by about 10-12 feet which would make the new toilet about 15 feet from the stack. There are no other fixtures on the line except for another toilet in a nearby bathroom.
    You plan to move a toilet that far away from any sink? Also, how far away would that second toilet actually be from the first, and is there also no sink near to it?

    It sounds to me like you might benefit from having a pro come assess your overall layout.

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,412

    Default

    You only 'need' one hole through the roof. Now, whether it is easier to tie the vent pipes all together somewhere in the house walls or attic depends on the layout.

    Having the toilet that far from the vent won't meet code. The distance depends on the size of the pipe - larger=longer. Even with 4", I don't think that would suffice.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,655

    Default vent

    It is too far to go without a vent, and I question whether you can move the original connection that far and still maintain the proper slope. The new location will be almost 4" higher than the original one. How the vent would be installed depends entirely on how the room and piping is configured.

  5. #5

    Default Vent

    Thanks for the feedback. I plan on moving the other fixtures as well but I want to concentrate on the toilet for now.

    So, it sounds like I need to vent the toilet. That is fine, I guess, just a bit more work. What do you think is the best (least invasive) way to add the proper venting to the line?

    I coincidentally had a building inspector look at my water heater lately and he mentioned some type of venting that "goes on the vertical part of the pipe." It sounded like he didn't think I would need to cut a bunch of holes up to the roof to move my toilet.

    Also, can you comment a bit more about the proper angle of the pipe? I know there is a specific slope that needs to be maintained but I want to ask the experts. I have pretty thick beams so I would estimate there is about 10-12" worth of vertical space along the run from the stack to the location of the new toilet.

  6. #6
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,202
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    1/4" per foot,
    Vent within six feet of the flange.
    Vent needs to be 2"



  7. #7

    Default Vent

    Thanks for the helpful drawing. Since I am going to be moving my other fixtures as well, I should probably just use the same venting system that I will be using for the toilet.

    Can I use 2" for venting the sink/shower/tub as well? Are the maximum distances from the vent still 6' for these fixtures?

    Is it okay to punch a secondary stack in my roof or do I have to vent it back to the main stack?

    I would prefer not to have to bring it back to the main stack since I would have to deal with cast iron.

    Thanks!

  8. #8
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,202
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    It helps if we know what code you are plumbing for.
    What does your plumbing permit say?

    We can't plumb without a permit, so we are going to assume that you are too.

    If it's UPC, then the max distance is
    1-1/2", 3-6"
    2-0", 5'-0"
    3-0", 6'0"
    toilets, 6-0"

    The vents can come back together above the flood level, normally 42" on the highest floor that you are combining on.

    Or you can run the vent(s) separately through the roof.

  9. #9

    Default Vent

    Thanks for all the info. Haven't got a permit yet but I would like to get a good plan in place and work out the details of the plan before I get started. The inspector was appreciative that I wanted to keep him involved in the process. I have a feeling I will need a bit of tweaking but I want to try to formulate my basic plan first.

    Okay, I think I have a pretty good understanding now of what will be required with regard to the venting and extending the 3" pipe to the new toilet location. Thanks again!

    Now, on to the other fixtures. Instead of extending the existing drain lines for the other fixtures, can I just take advantage of the new 3" pipe run I made for the toilet to drain the tub, shower, and sinks for the bathroom? Does the 3" pipe have the capacity to drain everything?

  10. #10
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,412

    Default

    A 3" pipe should be sufficient, but each fixture still needs to be vented individually.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  11. #11

    Default

    Thanks again!

    I am thinking of using one of the tees below. They are made of a flexible rubber like material. I am going to have to replace the current cast iron pipe with PVC and the current cast iron tee will have to go. The one side of the tee will go to my other toilet which is still using cast iron, the other side will go to my new PVC drain line. The part of the tee sticking out on the side will connect to the cast iron that flows the final few feet to the stack.

    How do these work? Am I using the correct part?

    I figure I this type of flexible tee will make it easier for me to get the proper slope on the new drain pipe.

    Here is the name of the tee: American ValveŽ 3" Flexible Tee w/Clamps
    Last edited by Akkula; 11-27-2008 at 07:49 PM.

  12. #12
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    You may absolutely not use that flexible rubber tee!
    If that line is ever needing to be snaked the snake will go right through the tee!

  13. #13
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,655

    Default permit

    You may have your priorities backwards. You do NOT get a permit then get things worked out before you start. You decide HOW you are going to do the job, THEN use that information for the permit. The building department will then TELL you what has to be changed before you can get the permit OR START the work. There is no way we can tell you how to install the toilet vent because there could be many ways, or just one way, depending on the location.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •