(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 45

Thread: why use purple primer on sche 40

  1. #1
    Home Handyman kskier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Buffalo NY
    Posts
    23

    Default why use purple primer on sche 40

    I am putting in some new 3" sche 40 drain pipe for a toilet, and I was told to use the purple primer before I glue the pieces together. Why do I need to do this, and do I apply the primer to both joints?

  2. #2
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,201
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    It's plumbing code.

    The primer cleans and softens the plastic.
    Without the primer, the joint can fail.

    The outside of the pipe, and the inside of the fitting gets primer and glue.
    You assemble with a slight twist.

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,399

    Default

    Yes...did you read the instructions?

    The primer cleans crud off the pipe and removes the finish gloss, then the glue can soften the plastic. The pipes are then actually welded together by the now softened plastic. WHen the solvent evaporates, it becomes essentially one piece. No primer, and it may not make a good joint. Plus, some inspectors will fail an installation if they can't see the primer. There is a clear primer, but as noted, it may not be legal where you are.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Yakima WA
    Posts
    7,246

    Default

    It has been my understanding (and this may or may not be accurate) that primer is required to remove an outer coating and to clean the pipe. I was made purple so that inspectors could easily see that primer was used. It is required on both the pipe ends and the interior of the fittings. Some of this may be folklore, I would expect some of the old veterans to correct me.

  5. #5
    Plunger/TurdPuncher kingsotall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Flagstaff, AZ Sitting on an upside down 5 gallon bucket next to the GO 68HD
    Posts
    1,260

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart View Post
    I was made purple so that inspectors could easily see that primer was used.


    By chance, is this you, Garyż



    I am only kidding...

  6. #6
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Yakima WA
    Posts
    7,246

    Default

    It almost could be me! I was working on my sprinkler system one time and was on my belly with my head down in the trench when I knock over the open can of primer. I had a purple head and neck for awhile. Damn, it take a long time for that stuff to wear off.

  7. #7
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    303

    Default

    If you are not in the city or the county/code does not require it.
    Don't use it. But only if you are not required to use it.

    I know what the can says, but it will not let the pipe bond that good.
    The cleaner does take off the pvc coating, but puts one of it's own on the pipe.
    The two pipes will not bond that good if cleaner is used.

    It is better to sand the ends to be glued.
    Use 220 grit to sand the pipe with. Sand it only good enough to remove the shinny part or just enough to remove the glaze.

    Cleaner is the biggest joke in the plumbing, when it comes to gluing pvc.


    Travis
    "I shall never surrender or retreat" -Col. William Travis


  8. #8
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Waterwelldude View Post
    If you are not in the city or the county/code does not require it.
    Don't use it. But only if you are not required to use it.

    I know what the can says, but it will not let the pipe bond that good.
    The cleaner does take off the pvc coating, but puts one of it's own on the pipe.
    The two pipes will not bond that good if cleaner is used.

    It is better to sand the ends to be glued.
    Use 220 grit to sand the pipe with. Sand it only good enough to remove the shinny part or just enough to remove the glaze.

    Cleaner is the biggest joke in the plumbing, when it comes to gluing pvc.


    Travis
    I'll just have to disagree with you...
    It is a 2 step process...
    Leave out one of the steps and failure of the joint is highly possible.

  9. #9
    Illinois Licensed Plumber SewerRatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    1,705

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Waterwelldude View Post
    If you are not in the city or the county/code does not require it.
    Don't use it. But only if you are not required to use it.

    I know what the can says, but it will not let the pipe bond that good.
    The cleaner does take off the pvc coating, but puts one of it's own on the pipe.
    The two pipes will not bond that good if cleaner is used.

    It is better to sand the ends to be glued.
    Use 220 grit to sand the pipe with. Sand it only good enough to remove the shinny part or just enough to remove the glaze.

    Cleaner is the biggest joke in the plumbing, when it comes to gluing pvc.


    Travis
    I have to disagree with you as well. I never had a properly primed and glued joint fail. It is a two step process. I just recently installed a new sump pump lid and a glue check valve. I forgot to install the lid before I glued the valve on, not even 45 seconds later I realized my mistake and tried to remove the glued and primed check valve from the pipe with no success. I ended up unscrewing the pipe from the pump and feeding it through the lid then back into the pump.

  10. #10
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    303

    Default

    PVC glue with cleaner. This has always been a good argument at lunch time...lol

    I will not use cleaner when I am gluing pvc.
    The cleaner is supposed to take off the wax layer.. It might, but it leaves a thin film of the cleaner itself. Any time a pipe has cleaner on it, it will not let the glue bond with the pvc.

    A simple test. Take 2 pieces of pipe and a coupling. One one piece use cleaner, and the other, no cleaner. Glue them together with the coupling.
    Let it sit over night if you want. Put the pipe in a vice with the coupling free.
    Use a pipe wrench on the opposite pipe, and turn. The side with the cleaner will be the one that turn. Every time.

    I have had this discussion with lots of plumbers. In some cases, it is in there rules they have to use cleaner to be up to code.

    When we have a service call, and we see they used cleaner. 9 out of 10 times, that piece of pipe will have some kind of tie or restraint on it.

    I myself will not use cleaner.


    Travis
    "I shall never surrender or retreat" -Col. William Travis


  11. #11
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    I've had several jobs repairing leaks in PVC DWV systems at 2 different houses where I'm 100% positive that no primer ever saw those pipes.

    Both houses were McMansions with lots of baths. The owners have been given a proposal to redo the entire DWV system but instead are looking to sell and are addressing the leaks as the occur.

    Skipping steps is not being nice to your customers.
    As far as I'm concerned there is no debate.

    Last edited by Redwood; 03-15-2009 at 09:18 PM.

  12. #12
    Illinois Licensed Plumber SewerRatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    1,705

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Waterwelldude View Post
    PVC glue with cleaner. This has always been a good argument at lunch time...lol

    I will not use cleaner when I am gluing pvc.
    The cleaner is supposed to take off the wax layer.. It might, but it leaves a thin film of the cleaner itself. Any time a pipe has cleaner on it, it will not let the glue bond with the pvc.

    A simple test. Take 2 pieces of pipe and a coupling. One one piece use cleaner, and the other, no cleaner. Glue them together with the coupling.
    Let it sit over night if you want. Put the pipe in a vice with the coupling free.
    Use a pipe wrench on the opposite pipe, and turn. The side with the cleaner will be the one that turn. Every time.

    I have had this discussion with lots of plumbers. In some cases, it is in there rules they have to use cleaner to be up to code.

    When we have a service call, and we see they used cleaner. 9 out of 10 times, that piece of pipe will have some kind of tie or restraint on it.

    I myself will not use cleaner.


    Travis
    Let me point you to what I said in this post http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...00&postcount=9

    I even tried to undo my glued joint with a pipe wrench. Your primer must have been contaminated or inferior. As I said never had a failed joint when using glue and primer. Key is to make sure the glue and primer is in good shape and clean. I prefer Black Swan products for they have the fastest set time I came across, since I mostly do service plumbing.

  13. #13

    Default

    Does it come in pink?

  14. #14
    Plunger/TurdPuncher kingsotall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Flagstaff, AZ Sitting on an upside down 5 gallon bucket next to the GO 68HD
    Posts
    1,260

    Default

    Tef tape does


  15. #15

    Default

    Wow, that is purty.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •