(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Rust Gunk Lining PVC Pipes from Well to Home

Hybrid View

  1. #1

    Default Rust Gunk Lining PVC Pipes from Well to Home

    We share a well with my parents. Their water and piping is fine. He put a lot of filters and such because of the hard water in our area. But the pvc pipes coming from the well to our home have about 1/4" rust looking gunk lining them. We discovered this when repairing a leak. They run about 1/8 mile down hill. Anyway we get rusty chunks, particles, specks in the water everyday so we can't even drink it. We cannot even have filters on our sinks or washer because they fill up and clog quickly.

    Our sinks, tub, dishwasher, toilet and washer stay orange! Whink Rust Stain Remover is the only product we have found to make them white again but are going through a bottle or two a week.

    I wanted to try putting it down the pipe but it is not supposed to be used for anything you may drink from. Is there anything I can put in my pipes leading to the house that will clean out all the gunk? We already tried Clorox Bleach in bothe the main filters and just in the pipes to our home and it got a lot of gunk out but once the bleach smell is gone after a day ro two the orange comes back and the water is not longer drinkable.

    What can we use? Is the Whink Stain Remover ok and would it work, and we just don't drink the water for a week?

    Thanks,
    Blake

  2. #2
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,207
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Please don't put anything in the pipes.
    You do drink that water right?

    You may want to put a filter on the incoming pipe if that's possible.

  3. #3

    Default

    We put a filter on it and it fills up so quickly, what says should last 3 months lasts 3 weeks.

    We also put filters on our faucets and they fill up with 1 week.

    The problem is the actually pipes underground needed cleaned.

  4. #4
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,792

    Default

    You have high ferrous iron in the water and all waters have some dissolved oxygen which is an oxidizer that will convert some of the iron into ferric iron (rust) thta lines the pipes the water runs through. The rest of the ferrous iron oxidizes when you use water and wherever the water is allowed to dry on a surface you get an orange to rusty reddish brown stain.

    You need a water test for ferrous, clear water iron, hardness and pH. Depending on how much iron, you would need a backwashed or regenerated filter that would remove both the ferrous iron and rust particles, or maybe a special water softener that can handle the amount of iron.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  5. #5
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by murray1987 View Post
    ... the pvc pipes coming from the well to our home have about 1/4" rust looking gunk lining them ...
    Is there anything I can put in my pipes leading to the house that will clean out all the gunk?
    Probably not. There might be some kind of professional cleaning process that could clear those lines for you and be able to flush them and leave them safe once again, but your best overall bet might be to have a new line run and to then protect it at the far end.

  6. #6
    Previous member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Riverview, Fl.
    Posts
    4,540

    Default

    If you want to knock a lot of it off, you can use air. Lots of air.

    It will make a mess and will possibly plug things up in your plumbing, not to mention the toilet fill device, the faucets and other things, but it does work.

    You could also replace those pipes.

    bob...

  7. #7

    Default

    To the "You have high ferrous iron in the water", EVERYTHING you said is true, but we have already taken care of all of that. In fact we have 2 sets of filter systems hooked up to the well.

    Like I said before, my parents do not have this issue, at least since a professional came out and cleaned the system and filled it with bleach. Ours were fine for 3 days and then the orange stains came back and so did the particles, then when we had a leak we discovered the pipes were lined thickly with gunk. So I figured there has to be something we can pour into our lines to clean them.

    Would a LOT of foaming drain cleaner work? The kind with 2 types of stuff in one bottle that you use on slow drains that is supposed to clean the walls of the drain?

  8. #8

    Default

    Don't use drain cleaner. Even if it works that stuff is hazardous in even small quantities.

    Iron Out is supposedly not harmful in small quantities (or so it implies on the bottle). People use it to clean water softener resin so I think as long as you give the pipe a good flushing afterward you should be ok. Here is what I would do; connect a whole house filter canister between the pipe and the well exactly where the pipe exits the well. Fill it part way with iron out.

    Next, disconnect the pipe from the pressure tank inside the house, buy and a piece of poly pipe, connect it to the pipe you disconnected from the tank and run it out of the house.

    Ok, now run the pump long enough to draw the iron out into the PVC pipe and stop. Wait a few minutes, the iron out will dissolve some of the iron, then turn the pump back on to flush the pipe. Repeat by adding more iron out to the filter canister until the pipe is clean.

    Anybody with thoughts on why not to try this before digging up and replacing the pipe?

    -rick

  9. #9
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    200 miles south of Little Rock
    Posts
    2,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drick View Post
    Anybody with thoughts on why not to try this before digging up and replacing the pipe?
    In my own opinion, that would greatly depend upon the overall knowledge and experience of whoever is doing it. This is somewhere around 600' of potable water line with lives at stake at the end of the job.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •