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Thread: Clay roof tile - "Spanish clay"

  1. #1
    Plunger/TurdPuncher kingsotall's Avatar
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    Default Clay roof tile - "Spanish clay"

    Customer has leaky roof. Determined that it is from poor flashing job around chimney. Planks of wood roof are rotted. The whole roof is in this order:
    t&g planks, tar felt paper, rolled shingle roofing paper, Spanish tile.
    Now to the question, they want to know if the area in disrepair is fixed how does one make certain that when the clay roof tile is nailed down that the nail penetration doesn't in turn invite a leak.

    Last edited by kingsotall; 11-02-2008 at 07:37 PM. Reason: Forgot to add pic of the offending culprit

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    If you put down a layer of Bututhane (sp?), it would seal around the nailholes. This stuff is made by various companies - Grace being one. It comes on a roll, about 4' wide. It is sticky and is sort of like double-stick tape with a release layer. It is often called ice and water shield.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default nails

    The nails are under the next course of tiles so the rain should not flow over or around them. The same as with any other roof covering, i.e.; shingles, rool roofing, etc.

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Never heard of putting rolled roofing under tiles. Back in the day, the tiles were put on skip lath, but today they use plywood, then felt, then the tile. Nails are not an issue. With tile roof, it is ALL ABOUT the flashing. The guy has to know what he is doing to flash everything well.

    Make sure to install bird blocks and fire stops on the eave ends. Many homes with tile roofs were lost in the recent fires due to embers blowing up under the eave edge of the tile.

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    Plunger/TurdPuncher kingsotall's Avatar
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    Thanks for stating the obvious HJ.

    All good advice, thanks fellas.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The clay tiles don't seal like a typical 3-tab roofing, so rain can blow or ice dams can move water up under them much easier than they can with an asphalt roof. Ice and water shield will protect things. It may be overkill, and not necessary in all areas, but it will help if the conditions exist.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    The clay tiles don't seal like a typical 3-tab roofing, so rain can blow or ice dams can move water up under them much easier than they can with an asphalt roof. Ice and water shield will protect things. It may be overkill, and not necessary in all areas, but it will help if the conditions exist.

    I think you are very right about that. I would guess that clay tiles....very common here in southern California.....would not be an appropriate roof in other climates. Rain?? I think it rained in 1992. Maybe that was 1892.

  8. #8
    Plunger/TurdPuncher kingsotall's Avatar
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    We have very wet, snowy winters. Almost seems like a glutton for punishment using this type of tile in our area.

  9. #9
    DIY Senior Member burleymike's Avatar
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    I have a tile roof that is 27 years old. It has been a thorn in my side for the 3 years we have owned this house. It is a beautiful roof but it is a pain to walk on literally like walking egg shells, step in the wrong spot and they break.

    I have had to reflash every penetration and all the valleys. The roof deck has some damage due to these leaks.

    The previous owners fixed the leaks by placing a plastic drop cloth in the attic sloped towards the eves. Yes stupid was there last name!

    The people that put the roof on were kings as hack jobs. I am no roofer but I know you should not put a tile roof on top of two yes 2 asphalt roofs. At least they knew to add a bunch more purlins to support the extra weight.

    The tile looks so nice but I am just about ready to tear it all off and put on an asphalt roof.

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