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Thread: double flange ?

  1. #1

    Default double flange ?

    i'm putting in new flooring in the basement bathroom (poured cement floor)

    the existing toilet base flange is set into the poured concrete, flush to the concrete level.

    by the time I add up the delta-FL , then laminate foam, then the laminate flooring, i've added almost an inch (1") of floor above the existing flange.

    Rule no 1 - keep the base of the toilet flange, on top of the floor.

    so, can I just add a new flange, into the existing flange, and use the same
    flange bolts based in the existing flange, to come up through the 1" of new floor, and through the new floor flange, or should I remove the one set in concrete, and install a new flange on top of the tile floor ?

    existing flange, before adding new floor..
    Last edited by bobmac; 10-31-2008 at 08:18 AM. Reason: delta

  2. #2
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Here's your picture link. It's too big for a direct post.

    http://img364.imageshack.us/img364/5...mtfloordp9.jpg

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    What is delta-sm?

    The only way to put cement board on a cement floor is if you've attached a wood floor down first. Do NOT apply cbu directly to a slab...first, there's no need, second, no manufacturer allows it (except Wedi which isn't really a cbu, but acts nicely like one), and you can't anchor it properly to the slab using the specified fasteners. You might be able to use something like EasyMat, but normally, you don't need a cbu decoupling layer on a slab in good condition. If you slab is in bad shape, then there's other possibilities to fix it for tile.

    What's on the floor now?

    Suggest you check out www.johnbridge.com for tiling questions.

    As to the flange, get a flange extender which will raise the flange up to where it needs to be. They come in various styles, some have a gasket, some you just silicon to the old one, then screw it to the old one for support. It will either have slots for the bolts, or you use longer ones to the original.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    You should remove the existing one and install a new one on top of the new finished floor.

  5. #5
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    I wouldn't jack up a slab to account for the height of tile. As noted, unless there's something really strange going on, you should be able to tile directly to the slab. The flange IS designed to be mounted on top of the finished floor, and is where it is supposed to be, but there are probably millions of flange extenders installed (an acceptable practice) and even more extra thick or doubled up wax rings (almost always wrong!).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default flange

    quote; but there are probably millions of flange extenders installed (an acceptable practice) and even more extra thick or doubled up wax rings (almost always wrong!).
    My opinion is exactly the opposite of what you state, but that is just an opinion based on years of observation by a professional. Before you get too far into the system, if you intend to use extenders, be sure that you can locate closet bolts long enough to anchor from the old flange, through the extender, and then through the toilet's base. The extenders have to be sealed between them, and clamped to the old flange with independent washers and nuts. Use good bolts because once they are installed they cannot be replaced without also removing the extenders.
    Last edited by Terry; 10-31-2008 at 09:54 AM.

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