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Thread: Rotted studs

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  1. #1

    Default Rotted studs

    I am replacing a bathtub and surrounding tile walls due to water damage.
    After I tore out the walls I found the wall studs are rotted. The plumber doing the bathtub replacement said to leave them in and he will put new studs in next to them. Do I need to cut away the rotted portion of the existing studs or anything else to mitigate the rotting?

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    If it stays dry, it will stop rotting. If it gets wet again, the punky wood (like a sponge) would hold more moisture to allow it to rot faster.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Junior Member citm2000's Avatar
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    If you live where there are termites, you should remove the rotted wood. Most termite bonds won't cover any infestation that happens as a result of water damage.

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    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
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    The rotted wood, even once dry, contains the spores for further rot.

    Take it all out.
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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Spores are almost literally everywhere. They don't do anything if it is dry.If they are no longer structural, you either need to replace or sister, but again depending on how bad they are, there may not be much to sister to.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Radon Contractor and Water Treatment 99k's Avatar
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    There is no time like the present ... rip it out! It's easy.

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    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    Spores are almost literally everywhere. They don't do anything if it is dry.If they are no longer structural, you either need to replace or sister, but again depending on how bad they are, there may not be much to sister to.
    Everywhere, sure - but not in the concentrations you'll find on an already-rotting piece of wood.

    I work on beach houses a lot; and I used to work on boats.

    I stand by my previous statement: if the new wood ever gets damp, it will rot out MUCH FASTER if it's up against old rotted wood, than if the old rotted wood was removed.
    Master Plumber Mark:

    there is nothing better than the
    manly smell of WD 40 in the air
    while banging away on brass with a chisel and hammer...

    it smells like......victory......

    do not hit your thumb...
    __________________
    Just so everyone's clear: I'm the POODLE in the picture ("french", get it?) The hot woman is my wife.

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