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Thread: Where Do I Begin? Fan Motor Squealing

  1. #16

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    Can I use a pancake fans commonly found in computer and electronic equipments? My work place throws away tons of old equipment and I can pry one of those fan off. All I need is to fab some mounting bracket onto the original plate from the fan unit. What are the typical computer fan cfm rating? Around 70 cfm I hope.

  2. #17
    IT Consultant / Network Engineer beekerc's Avatar
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    Default fan replacement

    you very possibly could, however, if it were me, i'd order the replacement part directly from nutone/broan. failing that, my next option would probably be to find the same fan on **** or craigslist (with the usualy buyer beware precautions, etc.) and cannibalize it for the parts you need.

  3. #18
    DIY scratch-pad engineer leejosepho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xroad View Post
    Can I use a pancake fans commonly found in computer and electronic equipments? ... Around 70 cfm I hope.
    Even though that type of fan comes in various sizes, capacities and voltages, the typical fan from a computer's power supply or cabinet is not likely to have anywhere near that CFM and will likely need 12 VDC.

  4. #19

    Default model N671-H

    Quote Originally Posted by leejosepho View Post
    Even though that type of fan comes in various sizes, capacities and voltages, the typical fan from a computer's power supply or cabinet is not likely to have anywhere near that CFM and will likely need 12 VDC.
    Yes, I just looked up some of the spec on these computer fans. You're right. cfm is very low.

    Found another number on the fan sub assembly, stamped on the mounting plate ... model N671-H

    The motor:

    Model#: 85T (the number is fuzzy, possibly 05T)
    T.P. : "L" (I don't know what this number means)
    120V
    60Hz
    1.3A
    99080285 (possibly 99000285, I think it's a Broan OEM part number, many of their motor number is 99080### in their assembly diagram)

  5. #20
    Homeowner Thatguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xroad View Post
    Yes, I just looked up some of the spec on these computer fans. You're right. cfm is very low.

    Found another number on the fan sub assembly, stamped on the mounting plate ... model N671-H

    The motor:

    Model#: 85T (the number is fuzzy, possibly 05T)
    T.P. : "L" (I don't know what this number means)
    120V
    60Hz
    1.3A
    99080285 (possibly 99000285, I think it's a Broan OEM part number, many of their motor number is 99080### in their assembly diagram)
    The fan above uses 1.15A for 70 cfm so this one must be slightly more than 70. The noise level probably depends on the propeller design.

  6. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thatguy View Post
    The fan above uses 1.15A for 70 cfm so this one must be slightly more than 70. The noise level probably depends on the propeller design.
    Thanks for the help ThatGuy, so what number do I need to bring to Grangers? 85T, 99080285, or N671-H ?

  7. #22
    Computer Programmer Bill Arden's Avatar
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    Default

    another option is to forget the fan all together and add a separate blower fan in the attic.

    Personally... I'd replace the bushings with bearings. It's a tricky procedure involving shimming the core and epoxying the new bearings in place, but it's one sure way to make it last.
    Important note Ė I donít know man made laws, just laws of physics
    Disclaimer: I'm a big fan of Darwin awards.

  8. #23
    DIY Member Joe Six Pack's Avatar
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    How hard would it be to replace the fan?
    Do you have access to it?
    How long has the fan motor been squealing?
    Does it just squeal? or does it rattle some too?
    Joe Six Pack

  9. #24
    Homeowner Thatguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xroad View Post
    Thanks for the help ThatGuy, so what number do I need to bring to Grangers? 85T, 99080285, or N671-H ?
    Try their customer service phone #
    http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/sta...nfo.html&linkB

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Six Pack View Post
    How hard would it be to replace the fan?
    Do you have access to it?
    How long has the fan motor been squealing?
    Does it just squeal? or does it rattle some too?
    The fan unit housing is inside the ceiling of a basement apartment. Tough to get to. That is why I canot find out the model mumber of the whole unit. Also difficult to sync up with the tenant to get into the apartment.

    It is very old. 10 years, maybe.

    It has been squealing for a while.

    No rattling.

  11. #26
    Homeowner Thatguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xroad View Post
    Can I use a pancake fans commonly found in computer and electronic equipments? My work place throws away tons of old equipment and I can pry one of those fan off. All I need is to fab some mounting bracket onto the original plate from the fan unit. What are the typical computer fan cfm rating? Around 70 cfm I hope.
    Here's one from
    http://www.allelectronics.com/make-a...20/Fans/3.html
    that runs on 120vac.

    CAT# CF-275CAT# CF-275
    EZ Fan # FP-108-1-S3B. 4.69" square x 1.5". 110/120 Vac, 0.11 Amps. 54 CFM. Ball bearings. Aluminum housing with 5 blades. Terminals can be soldered or used with standard fan plug. UL, CSA.

  12. #27

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    As jbfa74 suggested, go buy the exact fan and take the guts out of it. I had no idea what the original model is. So I cannot do that. I went on to look for a motor.

    From ACE, with shipping, $22. Gaingers is about the same price.

    Figure I stop by Lowes and Home Depot and see what they got. They have replacement motor and fan cage assembly for $25 or so. They did not have the size I needed. Apparently Broan had 7-1/4" x 7-1/2" mounting plate and 7-1/4" x 8" mounting plate. The same guts fits in all different models.

    Now that I don't need to find out what EXACT model number is ..... I started to looked at new fan unit ... 50 cfm unit cost $12. 70 cfm (what I needed) cost $28. Only difference is the size of the motor and the fan cage. The guts from either will fit for my need. So for about $8 more, I can get what I need NOW without waiting.

    Anyway, the bathroom where this is used is pretty tiny. So, I went the cheap way and bought the 50 cfm instead of the 70 cfm, $12 one.

    In the end, I learn that the motor & fan cage is 95% of the whole new unit. Many places actually sells the motor higher price than the whole new unit!

    I am surprise Broan sells the 50 & 70 cfm unit for such a big difference in price. The bigger motor cannot cost that much more.

    Thanks all for your help.
    Last edited by xroad; 11-01-2008 at 12:22 PM.

  13. #28
    Homeowner Thatguy's Avatar
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    "The bigger motor cannot cost that much more."

    Supply and demand.
    A starter motor for a Harley costs 10x anybody's else's motor.

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