(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Tub overflow need to be straight?

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member inexplorata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    19

    Default Tub overflow need to be straight?

    Hey all, I've been reading this forum like crazy, tons of good stuff here.

    I'm dropping in a new deck-mount tub upstairs, and I picked up a groovy cable-driven overflow/stopper dealie. The tub is deep -- 33 inches from drain to lip -- and it's a center drain I've got nearly filling the far wall of the bathroom.

    I've got the waste roughed in fine, but the overflow coming straight down (as it usually would, to meet the drain waste pipe) would mean still more holes in a perfectly good floor joist (they run parallel to the tub). I feel like I've probably put as many holes in it as I should Would it be OK to turn the drain line 90 degrees and have the overflow sort of wrap around the tub a bit (keeping a good slope) and come down? In other words, would another foot or two of pipe in that overflow line be a problem?

  2. #2
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    humid summers hot, humid winters cold
    Posts
    2,152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by inexplorata View Post
    .... turn the drain line 90 degrees and have the overflow ... wrap around the tub ... and come down ... another foot or two of pipe in that overflow line ....
    Yes, it's OK to do this. From the tub, slope the overflow pipe so it goes horizontal, with a minor slope, and then have the pipe turn down above or near the spot where it will connect to the tub drain. Which fitting will you be using at that point?

    David

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member inexplorata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    19

    Default

    I figured a sanitary wye and a 1/8th bend, or a combo, depending on how much wiggle I need.

    I had another thought: what about wrapping that overflow all the way around (with a little drop along the way) and coming down on the other side of the tub? Then I'd be pretty much in line and could do all the below-tub work between two joists... and before you ask, I don't want to just flip the tub 180 degrees, because then the first thing you'd see looking at it would be the overflow, which might take away from the ungodly-expensive roman tub filler my wife wants.

  4. #4
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    humid summers hot, humid winters cold
    Posts
    2,152

    Default

    Fantastic thinking. You are welcome to stick around here and contribute for ten or twenty years. : - )

    A way to kill two birds with one stone is to buy a "Geberit Integrated Cascading Tub Filler and Bath Waste/Overflow" http://www.terrylove.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7037 . It puts the water spout in the same place as the overflow.

    Then, you get to enjoy one_fewer_piece of expensive chrome to look at when you enter the bathroom. Cleaner lines.

    David

  5. #5
    Master plumber Jay Mpls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    98

    Default

    Can you get ahold of what is called a direct drain? In other words it drain into the trap from the waste outlet instead of going straight down from the overflow.Hope this helps.

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,605

    Default spout

    Unless that unit has an air gap/backflow preventer it is completely illegal. The spout has to be at least 3" above the tub. That spout is the same as the ones in the indirect waste tubs made 100 years ago and went out of business for the same reason.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •