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Thread: Huge Root Issue

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  1. #1

    Default Huge Root Issue

    I'm sure that this has been posted before, but I'm going to ask anyway because of the nuances (I believe) of my problem. I've got a 60+ year old home that does not have a house trap at all. This morning we noticed that sewage was leaking up from the 2 drains (one in the garage) one in the basement, and called roto rooter. He opened the drains and informed me that there are several (unknown how many at this time) root masses blocking the sewer pipes and while we could cut the roots out and cut down the tree, the roots would likely continue growing and we'd eventually buckle? the lines and have to replace them completely. He suggested putting in a new line outside and running it to the street (probably 30 feet) and bypassing the current lines. He quoted me nearly $9000 which is almost 10% of what I paid for the house.

    Should I:
    1. Go ahead and do this--there's no alternative (but shop around on price).
    2. Try and have the roots dug out and then put root killer down the sewage pipes 1x per year.
    3. Cut down the tree and do #3.
    4. Call the previous owner and threaten to sue until they help fix the issue. This isn't a new issue, it's been growing this way for years (so the plumber says), and we would be required to disclose it to new owners--it wasn't disclosed to us (our inspector didn't run a camera through the plumbing).
    5. None of the above--let the place fall over, chances are it's worth less than we paid for it anyway.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sb305198 View Post
    I'm sure that this has been posted before, but I'm going to ask anyway because of the nuances (I believe) of my problem. I've got a 60+ year old home that does not have a house trap at all. This morning we noticed that sewage was leaking up from the 2 drains (one in the garage) one in the basement, and called roto rooter. He opened the drains and informed me that there are several (unknown how many at this time) root masses blocking the sewer pipes and while we could cut the roots out and cut down the tree, the roots would likely continue growing and we'd eventually buckle? the lines and have to replace them completely. He suggested putting in a new line outside and running it to the street (probably 30 feet) and bypassing the current lines. He quoted me nearly $9000 which is almost 10% of what I paid for the house.

    Should I:
    1. Go ahead and do this--there's no alternative (but shop around on price).
    2. Try and have the roots dug out and then put root killer down the sewage pipes 1x per year.
    3. Cut down the tree and do #3.
    4. Call the previous owner and threaten to sue until they help fix the issue. This isn't a new issue, it's been growing this way for years (so the plumber says), and we would be required to disclose it to new owners--it wasn't disclosed to us (our inspector didn't run a camera through the plumbing).
    5. None of the above--let the place fall over, chances are it's worth less than we paid for it anyway.

    Thanks!

    You own the house, you own the problem.

    Have the roots cutout, or live in sewage. Your choice. Not sure why you did not have roto rooter do the cleanout while they were there. That is a common pipe cleanout problem if you have trees.

    As far as the scare tactics are concerned, never deal with anyone who trys to rip you off that way. Get a price from a few other people if you want to make a big deal out of it. You want your pipes roto rootered, not your pocket book.

    I would just have the roots roto rootered when (and if) the pipe clogs up again.

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks LM, I appreciate your advice. I think you are right about the scare tactics--it's a shame because normally these guys are pretty reputable. I'm going to opt for #2...literally, I love sewage, it does a lot of nice things for my complexion.

    Would you bother with having the massive tree felled, or just not worry about it for right now and see if the roots do come back?

    -scott.

  4. #4

    Default

    One more quick question...how does one normally price out a job such as rotorootering--is it by the foot, the severity of the problem? Is there a fair estimate that I should be looking for or just some factors I need to consider.

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member Mike Swearingen's Avatar
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    Jan 2005
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    On Albemarle Sound In Northeastern NC
    Posts
    621

    Default

    Scott,
    You apparently have an old sectional drain line (most likely cast iron) which will continue to allow root intrusion between the sections until you replace it with something solid like white plastic PVC or black plastic ABS pipe (IF allowed locally) that won't allow root intrusion ("glued" sections).
    Even if you roto-rooter it out, the roots will probably re-appear in 1.5-2 years.
    Get several bids on replacing the line, and try to save the trees.
    Good Luck!
    Mike

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
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    21,434

    Default

    From what I hear, the company you mentioned works on commission, and their prices are quite high. Get several quotes, I'm pretty sure you will be able to get it done for quite a bit less. A good portion of the cost is digging. It depends on how deep, and the kind of soil, and how far. Sometimes, it is cheaper to abandon the old line and run a new one, especially if the old one ran underneath a big tree. See what the pros have to say.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7

    Default

    Thanks both:

    @ mike-I believe you are right about the type of plumbing-it's black PVC in my garage (where the trap should be but isn't) but I don't know as that means anything for the rest of the line.

    @ jad-that's an excellent point, do you know of anyone that doesn't work on comission that is a larger company, or are they all this way? If I feel competent to do the digging could you reccomend that or would it be a fool's errand? My first quote suggested what you said, but that was why the cost was so high. He said that the alternative (having to replace everything when the roots buckle the plumbing) would be even more expensive--which I'm sure is true, I just don't like my hand being forced that way.

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