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Thread: lots of water in vent pipe

  1. #1

    Default lots of water in vent pipe

    Hello, You helped me so much with recommending and installing my new Toto Drake that I hope you can help me with this elementry question.

    I am changing out a faucet in a guest bathroom. When I disconnected the vent pipe adjacent to the trap water poured out of the vent pipe. I placed a bucket under the pipe and it was filled rather quickly. It still continues to drip and will fill up the second bucket. Is it nomal for vent pipes to be full of water?

    Thanks.

    Lea

  2. #2
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    if the pipe is going the wrong way and
    does not have fall to the drain it can collect
    condensation and rain water from the vent
    going out the roof... the water in the vent line can
    basically close the vent off.....

    if its pvc its no big deal, it will never rot away...

    but if it still seems to work,
    dont worry too much about it.

    you could put a hood cjhimmney like cover on
    your stack going out the roof to keep the water from collecting
    in the vent line.

  3. #3

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    '
    Quote Originally Posted by master plumber mark
    if the pipe is going the wrong way and
    does not have fall to the drain it can collect
    condensation and rain water from the vent
    going out the roof... the water in the vent line can
    basically close the vent off.....

    if its pvc its no big deal, it will never rot away...

    but if it still seems to work,
    dont worry too much about it.

    you could put a hood cjhimmney like cover on
    your stack going out the roof to keep the water from collecting
    in the vent line.

    Mark,
    I think you nailed it when you said the line doesn't have enough fall. There is an AC system directly above this vent pipe. The pipe probably continues in the ceiling for quite a ways before turning upwards towards the roof. I have never heard any glubbing sounds or anything that leads me to believe the line is needing air to flow. I guess I will leave well enough alone. I'm on my third bucket of water now but is seems to be slowing a bit. Hopefully...
    Thanks so much.

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default vent

    I do not know how you could possibly have disconnected the vent pipe while changing the faucet since it is inside the wall. You probably disconnected the AC drain line which is fastened to the drain line from the sink above the trap. It should not have water in it, but could have been improperly installed so it has to have a dip to make the connection. If that is what it is then it will drip as long as the AC is dehumdifying the air.

  5. #5

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    I disconnected the trap arm, the horizontal arm that extends from the p-trap to the vent pipe in the wall.
    Since we haven't had much rain lately I was curious about the source of the water. I got up into the attic and discovered that both my AC units are indeed hooked up to this pipe. It is hot and humid in Texas right now and the AC units are dumping water as fast as they can down this pipe. Thanks for your reply.
    Live and learn.

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default vent

    IF the AC drains are connected directly to the vent/sewer pipe in the attic then in the winter time when there is no condensation to keep the traps full, you will draw sewer gas into the units and blow it around the house.

  7. #7

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    This 3/4 inch pipe is just for the faucet to vent plus to allow the AC to drip condensation. I believe the heater intakes in a different location. At least I've never smelled sewer gases coming from the heater before and hopefully never will in the future. Eck!

    This story has a happy ending in that we figured out why there was so much water pouring out of the vent pipe, we altered the plumbing to eliminate the blockage. And I promise to never, never, never throw acids down a sink again which is what started this ordeal in the first place.

    Thanks everyone.

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