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Thread: Bacteria in water system

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  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member WV Hillbilly's Avatar
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    Default Bacteria in water system

    After a heavy rain my well water got turbid . I purchased a maytag/g e homespring off that big auction site . It was new in factory box . I installed a bypass so I could get water without going through the filter . Before I ran any water through the filter I used a bacteria test like lowe's sells . There was quite a bit of stuff growing in the petrie dish .
    My well has about 30 feet of water in it . It's only about 44 feet deep . I put 2 cups of clorox in the well & using a garden hose followed the clorox with 10 to 15 gallons of water . I then opened faucets , hot & cold , one at a time till I smelled the clorox . I then let the sysyem set for about 24 hours .
    I then opened all faucets untill all smell of clorox was gone . I then closed the bypass valve & opened the valves on the inlet & outlet of the filter . The only part of the system that didn't get clorox was the new pipes going to the filter & the filter itself . I completed the system & started running water through the filter a couple weeks or so ago . We have had a couple hard rains since then & my water stayed crystal clear . I just completed my second bacteria test & there was some growing in the petrie dish but not near as much as before .
    The homespring filter is supposed to remove bacteria . Should I clorox the well again & let the water run through the filter & new pipes ? Did I do something wrong the first time I put clorox in the system ? Chlorine is not supposed to harm the filter . Actually one method of cleaning the membrane in the filter says to use clorox . The homespring has a carbon prefilter in it . Will that affect the sanitation of the system if I clorox it again ? For what I paid for the homespring I am happy with it if it just keeps my water clear . If I have to add something after the filter for bacteria what would you suggest ? U V or something else ? Thanks in advance .

  2. #2
    Master Plumber nhmaster's Avatar
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    You should have your water tested at a lab. The Lowes kit tells you nothing except that something is down there. Not all bacteria are harmfull. Clorinating is a good idea though for a dug well.

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member WV Hillbilly's Avatar
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    Still waiting for your thoughts on putting clorox in my well again & wondering if the carbon prefilter will make the clorox ineffective ?? Should the amount of clorox I used the first time & the method I used killed all the bacteria in my system ?? Thanks

  4. #4
    Like an engineer alternety's Avatar
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    A couple of points.

    You may have bacteria in the pieces around the filter that were not sterilized. With the carbon filter out you should sterilize the filter, and the rest of the system again using your original methodology. The filter should be included in sterilization. Any piece of material touching the water can contaminate it. It could be the test media. Do one from the same manufacturing batch without adding water. Did you use a container to put the water in the test medium.

    It is possible you are getting contamination while doing the tests by airborne bacteria or not handling things properly.

    Did you open faucets on ALL the circuits in the house? Did you start with an empty bladder tank and water tank? If not the chlorine may have been too diluted. The only water that is starting with chlorine is the 30' in the well. It will start to dilute as soon as you start pumping. Depending on down the hole and tank flow patterns, results may not have been what you think. You might want to add chlorine as pumping occurs. Empty the tanks and do it again.

    The filter WILL remove all bacteria. It is either broken or it is something you are doing after the filter. Remember if there is a little bacteria it will grow just like in the test and propagate through your system.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member Mike Monett's Avatar
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    Default Well Bacteria Fix

    To All,

    I have just posted a new method of killing well bacteria that may be of interest. Please see

    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...a-fix&p=305995

    Look for my post near the bottom of the page. There are too many related threads to monitor, so please post any questions or replies to that thread.

    Thanks,

    Mike Monett

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member rickr's Avatar
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    Hi There,

    I am very desperate and quite curious about your stainless rod and copper bacteria elimination solution. My perfect well since 1991 became contaminated with what I believe is iron bacteria as a result of me changing my own pump. I put the 190' of hose and pump on the damp mossy ground to change the dead pump. A month later the water started smelling and tasting swampy and has gotten rpogressivlty worse since. I do not want to be the DIY idiot that further ruins my once perfect well and water. I am told to shock the well and it may or may not take care of the problem. Even them I'm told its a short term solution and I have effectively ruined the well and will have to shock it continually forever more. Your solution however has given me hope. I would be forever grateful for a little more info. Will this work with a well that is alrewady contaminated and smelly, like mine? How far down in the water do I need to put the rod and will the 12 feet work in a 195' well with an average water yield of 40 GPM? Should I first shock the well the try the rod? Does it really work? Its hard to believe you and your friend have come up with this solution and have not tried to capatalize on it like the majority of folks would do...I'm like you however, help where I can! It makes sense as when I had algae growing on my roof, I was told to use copper strips at the peak, which I did and over the period of a summer woth of rain, the algae disappered. Any other help you would care to offer would be most appreciated. Your designer friend Mike does not accept PM's. Cant say as though I blame him. Thanks again, Rick

  7. #7
    General Engineering Contractor ballvalve's Avatar
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    I never saw any stainless steel in a shower rod, but chrome plated steel. SS drills okay, but chrome does not. You'll have to go the metal shop and choose one of 3 or 4 alloys of SS available. I don't know where chrome is on the scale, but winemakers often hang copper rods or sheets in a wine barrel to rid of hydrogen sulphide. You can also buy copper sulphate in liquid form.

  8. #8
    Like an engineer alternety's Avatar
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    You should note that in a post in this thread, the developer asks that you post questions to a specific other thread.

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