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Thread: Toilet Flange Too High / Spacer?

  1. #1

    Default Toilet Flange Too High / Spacer?

    I'm getting ready to install new tile and realize that after I put in new cbu and tile -- the new toilet flange will be about 0.2 inches above the finished floor.

    Any advice on what to do?

    Could I use a spacer between the finished floor and and bottom of flange or could I remove 0.2 inches of material from the bottom of the flange or any other recommendations?

    I can provide a picture if needed.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    The flange needs to be mounted on top of the finished floor.
    It may be so high that the toilet will not set down on the floor.

  3. #3

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    The flange needs to be mounted on top of the finished floor.
    It may be so high that the toilet will not set down on the floor.
    I was thinking it would be too high -- that's why I was considering removing 0.2" of material from the Toilet Flange. Would this work OK --
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  4. #4
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    No the pipe needs to be cut off.
    Removing material out ot the connection will only make a loose socket connection at the joint.

  5. #5
    In the Trades Master Plumber 101's Avatar
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    You can acheive this by using a inside pipe cutter. That's if you are refering to pvc.
    "Labor create's all wealth and therefore that all wealth belong's to Labor"

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Is the ring plastic or metal? The very long slots might look like it would give more freedom, but it also means a very long distance from any support.

    If the stub of the pipe sticking up won't allow you to fully seat the flange so it can sit flat on the top of the floor, then it can be difficult.

    The flange is designed so the pipe should fully bottom on the pipe (i.e., the pipe should be inserted fully into the flange socket). This gives it the proper support and joint strength. It will be stronger if the pipe fits fully into the flange. You do not want the pipe to only fit part way, since it is a tapered, interference fit, it would end up making a poor connection. When inserted, the cement actually melts the outer layer, fusing the two pieces together. If it doesn't fit all the way in, you won't get the material to bond properly once the solvents in the cement evaporate - there'd not be much left in the socket to hold anything. It isn't like a gap-filling glue. It could be less viscous, but then it's run all over the place. they make it gooey so it tends to stay where you put it.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    In many places, you will fail an inspection if you DON'T use the purple primer. The stuff gets burried in the wall...why care? I can take pride in the fact that it is run properly...the primer is just an artifact of what the inspectors require. Calling it hack is ignorant of the realities in MOST places. Reserve your comments for when that might apply...you're irritating many people. Your way may be great for where you live, but isn't many places. Doesn't make it better or worse. Until you see that, your comments will just end up being noise to be filtered out.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  8. #8

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    Here's my dllemma:

    The 4x3 (ABS) toilet flange (plastic ring) is just sitting on the (ABS) 90 degree hub -- I don't have the 3" pipe installed yet to couple the hub and the flange together. Just wanted to get an idea of how much gap I have right now.

    I know there is a toilet flange available that would fit inside the 90 degree hub.
    But I really don't want to do that -

    From what I read here and other forums -- that's a no no.

  9. #9
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Yes, it is a no-no to use a 3" inside flange. If you had a 4" pipe, it would be OK, but a 3" inside cuts the inside diameter of the pipe too much.

    Use the primer. I might be argued over a beer whether it is really necessary, but if the inspector wants it, give it to him. If you forgot to prime a joint, I would say leave it, but as a rule use the primer and everyone's happy except Master Plumber 101.

  10. #10
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Primer does two things, it cleans crud off the surface and makes the cement more effective by softening it a little.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  11. #11

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    Yes, it is a no-no to use a 3" inside flange. If you had a 4" pipe, it would be OK, but a 3" inside cuts the inside diameter of the pipe too much
    That's what I thought.

    I'm planning on buying a Toto Frake Eco -- does anyone know what the max height can be for a toilet flange using the Toto.

    As I mentioned earlier -- it looks like will be about 1/4" higher than a normal flange mounted on a finished floor.

  12. #12
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    If all you need is 1/4" you might try a marble slab.

  13. #13
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Flanges for all toilets no matter the brand or quality are supposed to set on top of the finished floor. If I was doing the job, I would do whatever was necessary to lower the flange and install the toilet right the first time.

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