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Thread: Pipe guard

  1. #1
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    Default Pipe guard

    In my unfinished basement, my water pipe comes up through the slab via the meter and up a wall. I am worried that someday the pipe might get knocked by something.

    Is there some sort of pipe protector that I can buy and screw to the wall around the pipe to protect it?

  2. #2
    In the Trades Master Plumber 101's Avatar
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    You can purchase split ring hangers for what ever size is required. It has a 3/8" female thread tapping. Get an anchor,I perfer 3/8"-16 Red head drop in
    anchors. It holds solid. Someone may have a better idea but this is how I would do it. Make sure you get the hanger for the right piping that was used.

  3. #3
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    Thanks Master Plumber. It is currently supported very well with hangers but I would like some kind of casing to prevent the pipe from being damaged from a sideways knock. Most pipes are normally closed off in cupboards but since my basement is unfinished this particular section is exposed against the wall.

    If my mower got pushed into it, for example, it might split the pipe.

    Any ideas?

    And no I will not paint the pipe orange or buy a left-hand drive mower, in response to the wise-guys.
    Last edited by Ian Gills; 08-18-2008 at 08:23 AM.

  4. #4
    In the Trades Master Plumber 101's Avatar
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    My next response was going to be paint it orange but you took my thunder from me. I can honestly say I'm not sure, I've never had that question arise. Can you have someone prefab something out of a heavy duty sheetmetal? Or become Jesus and start the wood work.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Why not just build a wooden box around the pipe? You wouldn't have to go all the way to the ceiling if you didn't want to, just 4' or so would protect it.

  6. #6
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    Thanks Gary. I am just surprised that there isn't an existing device for this. What do commercial applications use?

    Toto?

    Last edited by Ian Gills; 08-18-2008 at 09:15 AM.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    If you put up a pole(s) anchored into the concrete around it, it would keep most things from being able to contact the pipe. Lead anchors and a threaded pipe into a floor plate would work, and could be removed if you ever did finish the basement.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  8. #8
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    In Washington State, they install steel posts that attach to the concrete with four bolts.
    These are installed in garages, in front of devices with gas lines to prevent cars from hitting the gas connections.

  9. #9
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    I don't know of any product specifically intended for this purpose, I think it's just one of those things that are improvised to fit the particular situation. In other words, whatever works. You will want it to be stout enough to protect and removable without too much effort. Since you won't be crashing cars into it, while undoubtedly very effective, steel pillars might be a tad much in your basement. Possibly the simplest thing would be to put a bookcase or similar piece on each side.

  10. #10
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Things like these would commonly be used in commercial applications.









    I'm starting to see a disturbing trend with your lawnmower driving abilities...
    Have you had your eyeglass prescription checked lately? Perhaps it is why you are able to overlook the defects in Cadet 3 Toilets...

  11. #11
    Sound and Light Suppervisor for a School District tjbaudio's Avatar
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    depending on how big and how far out I would use a 2x4 attached to the wall on both sides and a 1x4 cap. Maybe a hunk of 3" or 4" PVC/ABS with a slot (or just cut in 1/2) that fits over the pipe and secured with plumbers tape or just some screws. How about a 4x4 and a dado cutter in a table saw? I think it would depend on what was around. Take a walk at the local big box store and see what pops out.


    OH found this with a google image search look about 1/2 way down http://www.derbyhouse.co.uk/prodlist...=165&scats=165
    Last edited by tjbaudio; 08-18-2008 at 02:58 PM. Reason: link
    tjbaudio
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  12. #12

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    The yellow posts mentioned above are called bollards in case anyone was wondering. I work in the banking equipment & construction industry and frequently install bollards to protect drive up equipment. you can get smaller bollards by searching with google.

    Jon

  13. #13
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default protection

    Depending on how close the pipe is to the wall, there are half round enclosures, often used for electrical wires on telephone poles, that would encapsulate it.

  14. #14
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    Thank you for all of your suggestions. "Bollard" certainly turned up a few results.

    I am surprised that more residences are not equipped with more bump protection.

    Related to my other similar post, my garden faucet guard arrived yesterday. I have painted it red and now just need to attach it to the wall.

    Hasn't anyone ever turned up at a residence to see the main in the basement dented or bumped by a careless homeowner (or should I say careless plumber for not installing bump protection)?

    I'll probably chuck a couple of these on for good measure...
    Last edited by Ian Gills; 08-19-2008 at 02:09 PM.

  15. #15
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default questions

    1. What is a basement? Is that an attic under the house?
    2. Who is paying the plumber to install that protection?
    3. Be more careful when you throw stuff around in the basement.

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