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Thread: toto drake not shutting off crisply

  1. #16
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    I change plumbers, this guy doesn't have a clue about excessive pressure. Gauges are cheap. Less than $15 at virtually any hardware store. You can't reduce pressure with a valve. That will reduce flow, but pressure remains the same no matter what the pipe size or valve opening. Many people mistake low flow for low pressure, especially older homes with ancient galvanized pipe that has corroded to the point there is a pencil sized hole for water. Pressure measures normal, but the water flow is a trickle. Adjust your new PRV and expansion tank to about 60 psi. That's plenty. In fact, I have mine set at 50 psi and everything work just fine.

  2. #17

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    just an update to this thread:

    1.) have not had to replace any of the original toilet components since the flow was reduced in 2009.

    2.) One mistake I made was in not contacting the municipal water utility / engineering to see if they had any responsibility for the pressure of water supplied at the service entrance or any capacity to modify that. In retrospect, I should have done that first.

    3.) fluid dynamics: http://sci301.uvi.edu/Plumbing/FluidDynamics.html

  3. #18
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    It is not the city's responsibility to lower the pressure. It is your responsibility to do what is necessary to lower the pressure to safe limits. It was explained to you 3 years ago that you needed a pressure regulator valve (PRV) and a thermal expansion tank. It would be my guess that you have leaking toilet valves because if all valves were good, the T/P on the water heater would open every time them water heater operates. You are running at least double the water pressure necessary for a home. As you were told way back when, 80 psi is the absolute maximum pressure but 50 or 60 psi is still plenty of pressure. Friend, you got good advice when you first posed the problem, you have just ignored it. Sure, you are under no obligation to take our advice, but if you don't want it, why do you ask? Yeah, this is pretty pointed, but take it or leave it.

  4. #19
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Did anyone mention the danger of failure of flex water supply lines at high pressure. And I am SHOCKED, SHOCKED, (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjbPi00k_ME) that you have not had a failure of a rubber washing machine hose at that pressure!

  5. #20
    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    You guys who responded to the original poster's update today missed the fact that he did indeed have his plumber come out and do the work in 2009.

    He told us that the plumber didn't have some of the essentials on his truck.

    He was updating us to the effect that now that he got the pressure reduced, he has had no further problems.

    Starfield Road, thanks for the update!

  6. #21
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Yes...missed the fact that he confirmed the noise went away when he turned down the flow, lowering DYNAMIC pressure, but then he also did have a plumber install a PRV, to maintain STATIC pressure. No worries, maties!

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