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Thread: DWV Layout

  1. #16
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    Two things I see to fix, and I'm not a plumber.

    For what it's worth.

    1. In the middle of Pic 1, the 90 is a short radius not a long sweep.
    2. In the second picture, you used a San Tee on its back instead of a combo (long sweep).
    Right next to it you have a combo (long sweep) for another pipe. Makes me say...

    Editorial remark: i believe you need a pro to come in and be there when you put this together in final form. The two things I spotted make me less than confident.

    David

    by the way,
    A.) in the first picture I see a lot of vents but i can't see where the vent goes up to the roof.
    B.) you have labeled something in Picture #1 as a 4x4x2x2 SanTee. Is that to be where the vents connect?
    C.) what is above the 4" pipe ?
    D.) more doubts
    Last edited by geniescience; 08-07-2008 at 07:02 AM.

  2. #17
    Geologist sjsmithjr's Avatar
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    You may have gone about as far as you can with a keyboard and a camera and need a set of experienced eyes on site. Here's something you might want to consider at this point. Where I live, you can call for a inspection and even though you're not truely ready for an inspection, you can go over what you're about to do with the AHJ. If he or she sees something they don't like or that you've flat out got wrong, they'll point it out to you so that when you call for a re-inspection it'll be right. The charge for a re-inspection here is nominal - $30.
    Last edited by sjsmithjr; 08-07-2008 at 09:08 AM.
    -Sam Smith
    Licensed Professional Geologist - AL, TN, KY

  3. #18
    DIY Junior Member tombat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geniescience View Post
    1. In the middle of Pic 1, the 90 is a short radius not a long sweep.
    I had two 90s - one long sweep and one not. Guess I should have taken the time to go get a second one. I'll replace it.

    Quote Originally Posted by geniescience View Post
    2. In the second picture, you used a San Tee on its back instead of a combo (long sweep).
    Right next to it you have a combo (long sweep) for another pipe. Makes me say...
    I realized I used the wrong fitting when I was labeling the picture. I plan on swapping it out. I copied this layout from a picture Terry Love posted. I figured since he is in my area, it must meet local codes. The difference between mine and his is that his drain goes down and mine goes horizontal, hence the need for a combo.

    Another piece I'm going to replace is the washer p-trap. I used a screw together trap instead of a glue trap. It was leaking when I filled the trap and I had already tightened it pretty tight. Best to just change it.

    Quote Originally Posted by geniescience View Post
    Editorial remark: i believe you need a pro to come in and be there when you put this together in final form. The two things I spotted make me less than confident.
    I'm working on setting that up right now.

    Quote Originally Posted by geniescience View Post
    A.) in the first picture I see a lot of vents but i can't see where the vent goes up to the roof.
    B.) you have labeled something in Picture #1 as a 4x4x2x2 SanTee. Is that to be where the vents connect?
    C.) what is above the 4" pipe ?
    D.) more doubts
    In the picture, above the 4x4x2x2 SanTee are a couple of 45s. These turn the 4" line so it goes past the ceiling joist and out the roof at that location. The pipe goes about 8" above the roof line. So, yes, that is where the vents connect and then exit the house.

    Thanks a lot for the input.

    Tom

  4. #19
    DIY Junior Member tombat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjsmithjr View Post
    You may have gone about as far as you can with a keyboard and a camera and need a set of experienced eyes on site. ...
    I believe you are correct. Sometimes I think we (people using this forum) expect a little too much from the experts. But at some point, there is only so much you can say from looking at a picture. At that point, it is time for some on-site help. I contacted a friend of mine who has a couple rentals and works with a plumber when needed. Sounds like he may be willing to give it a look.

    Thanks again to all who offered help. I think I came a long ways from the first set of pictures I posted.

    Tom

  5. #20
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    On second thought skip that cleanout I suggested earlier...
    It would be useless as you have it configured.

  6. #21
    DIY Junior Member tombat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood View Post
    I notice how you are doing the laundry tie in now. I would suggest a full size 4" cleanout installed there so if the mail line ever needs cleaning the plumber has a straight shot out.
    Quote Originally Posted by tombat View Post
    OK, are you suggesting I run the 4” past the laundry tie in or put a cleanout at the end of the 4” horizontal run? If you look closely (I know, difficult with pictures) but where I plan to tie in the 2” from the laundry/sink used to be a cleanout. I planned on bringing the drains into the stubbed out two inch on the horizontal 4” but that put the sink too high.

    So, if I put a 4” to 2" wye there with a cleanout, I should be able to keep the utility sink at a reasonable height. Also, if you notice the 4” pipe is at an angle that runs it right into the south wall. Should I turn the pipe so the cleanout is perpendicular to the south wall – this leaves about a 120 degree turn. If I leave the cleanout parallel to the wall, it will only give about 3 feet of access in front.
    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood View Post
    On second thought skip that cleanout I suggested earlier...
    It would be useless as you have it configured.
    So please, why don’t you elaborate on some of these suggestions you make. You suggested something, I asked for clarification. You do not respond until after I’ve re-done the work and you say it’s useless. Yet you still haven’t clarified what you are suggesting – you just say it is wrong.

    Thanks for the help.

    Tom

  7. #22
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Sorry for the lackof guidance on this...
    Business kept me away for a few says.
    The cleanout is pointed downward and towards a wall.
    The downward point will mean that it is always full of water and sludge making opening it messy to say the least.
    The downward point and having the wall in the way makes it impossible to use.
    The machine used for cleaning a main line is fairly large, usually mounted on a handtruck, and has a stiff cable that exits the machine at a bout 16" above the floor. To get it inthis cleanout requires first a downward bend then an upward bend. The cable is like a spring that is turning and winding up. you have to control it with your hands. One bend is doable 2 is a recipie for injury.

    Ihope that this insite provides the necessary guidance for placement of the cleanout.

  8. #23
    DIY Junior Member tombat's Avatar
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    Thanks for the response - sorry if I came across a little annoyed. I realize answering my questions isn't you primary task in life.

    You actually could have elaborated a little less and I would have understood.

    A simple "the bends are too tight for the sewer machine" probably would have worked.

    I'm familar with the sewer machines as I had one sitting in that exact spot shortly after I bought the house. Had a "major" rooter company out who snaked it for a while and concluded the main line needed to be replaced. Called a local one man sewer cleaning operation and he had it cleared in about an hour and all he used was a water hose.

    Anyway, back to the cleanout. I'm not sure what other location options I have but I'll see what I can come up with.

    I'm currently working on getting a plumber in to verify compliance to code.

    Thanks again.

    Tom

  9. #24
    DIY Junior Member tombat's Avatar
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    Had a plumber out this afternoon. Younger guy who is in the process of studying for his journeymans license. Seemed knowledgeable on the codes and the local inspectors.

    He only identified three problems, all of which have already been pointed out.

    The santee on its back for the utility sink drain
    The threaded p-trap for the washer. (has to be a glue trap or I have to provide an acess panel)
    And the 2" vent 90s that hj pointed out early on (I used 4 of them). Guess I should have listened. The vent 90s are only allowed in the attic.

    He said the cleanout wasn't ideal but he thought it was acceptable. Also said the full size vent wasn't required. The 4" 90 at the top of the drain is acceptable and doesn't need to be a long sweep.

    All the problems are easy fixes and will be handled.

    Thanks again for all the input.

    Tom

  10. #25
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    I didn't realize you are in Seattle.
    I was in Seattle yesterday doing plumbing.

    I hope the plumber that came out was paid for his time.

    I and most good plumbers no longer do free estimates.
    Plumbers get paid for their time.
    With the Seattle traffic, and the price of gas, and our extensive construction knowledge, it's the right thing.

    I use a lot of flat rate pricing, so I spend very little time working up quotes. The jobs have priced themselves by averaging out the variables.
    It saves both the homeowner and the contractor time, and that means money too.

  11. #26
    DIY Junior Member tombat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    I didn't realize you are in Seattle.
    I was in Seattle yesterday doing plumbing.
    I actually considered calling you - but didn't.

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    I hope the plumber that came out was paid for his time.
    He got paid his hourly rate. The dispatcher was hesitant to send him out at first but I made it clear I expected to be charged.

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    Plumbers get paid for their time.
    With the Seattle traffic, and the price of gas, and our extensive construction knowledge, it's the right thing.
    I agree, only I would change it to "Everyone should get paid for their time". I don't expect anyone to come to my house for free and help me with a project. Now if people want to offer up free advice on the internet, well, that's different.

    Tom

  12. #27
    Master Plumber nhmaster's Avatar
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    After the last fiasco, you gentlemen will please take note of the incredible restraint offered by the author of this post

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