(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: A "While I'm In There..." Question

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member turbocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Colorado USA
    Posts
    28

    Default A "While I'm In There..." Question

    Sheesh, I hope you guys like having weekend warriors like me around with all my amateurish questions. I do really appreciate the advice though.

    I recently opened up the drywall behind my bathtub to give the Master Plumber I hired ( I know my limits and happily hire the pros for certain fixes ) room to replace the old original shower valve/tub valve assembly for my shower/tub.

    My question is that with the wallboard out of the way there is total access to the plumbing that makes the drain, the drain selector tube and overflow apparatus, etc.

    I don't know whether I should replace all that or not? On the one hand there are no signs of sweating or leaking at least as far as I can conclude anywhere. On the other hand it is all about 25 years old now and I do see some super slight surface cracks on the rubber "grommet" to the drain selector tube and overflow apparatus. I don't think that would ever leak like that though but it is a sign of some aging. Everything else is just basic black ABS pipe with the typical compression type connections that all seem dry. Anyways, I just don't know whether "fix it now" or "leave it the hellalone" is appropriate here. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,781

    Default

    If you do decide to replace that (and I would be tempted) investigate whether quality components can be used and don't necessarily cheap out with PVC/ABS like the licensed pro did with me. See if a quality brass drain, overflow and quality drain appartus can be installed.

    Normally on old set ups like that the tub drain can be rusted into place and the only way to replace it is to cut it out. Another excuse to replace these bits while you have the chance.
    Last edited by Ian Gills; 10-26-2010 at 04:36 PM.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member turbocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Colorado USA
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Ian, thanks for the advice. So you're saying that sooner or later those things will likely leak? I was just going to replace the parts with similar ABS ( I didn't know ABS was a worse material than anything else available) but if I can I'll try to source the brass bits. Even so as soon as I get past the first tee its going to go into ABS anyway. Either which way with that, your vote is do it now because sooner or later those things will likely leak. Is that right? Thanks Again.

  4. #4
    Engineer Furd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Wet side of Washington State
    Posts
    446

    Default

    My advice would be to thoroughly inspect the ABS piping and if it looks good them just replace the rubber washer. Nothing wrong with either ABS or PVC plastic drainage piping. The best is if the backside can be fitted with an access cover so that it can be periodically inspected and if any repairs are necessary down the road they can be done through the access panel.

  5. #5
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,404

    Default

    If the finish on the drain components visible in the tub/shower are okay and not pitted or the finish flaking off, just replace the gasket on the overflow and leave it alone. The thing that is most vulnerable, other than the rubber components, is the trap. But, if that is ABS, it'll outlive you. Brass, when it gets old while sitting in drain water, can become brittle and pitted...look at it funny, and it can break. the metal parts other than the trap will last much longer. This is especially true if you ever used drain cleaning chemicals.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member Andrew21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    161

    Default

    If it makes you feel better, replace it. I'm going through the same thing with my bath remodel.

  7. #7
    In the Trades Jerome2877's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    384

    Default

    don't necessarily cheap out with PVC/ABS like the licensed pro did with me.
    Just because somethings cheaper doesn't make it inferior, the brass or chrome waste/overflows are normally used on claw foot tubs for asthetic purposes and are easier to change when they fail.

    The access panel is a good idea and glued connections are preffered if your going to replace it.
    Last edited by Jerome2877; 10-26-2010 at 09:36 PM.

  8. #8
    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Gills View Post
    don't necessarily cheap out with PVC/ABS like the licensed pro did with me. See if a quality brass drain, overflow and quality drain appartus can be installed..
    You're really stuck in the past aren't you?

  9. #9
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,781

    Default

    PVC is just so noisy. And much more susceptible to damage when plumbers snake it.

    I have never had metal pipes fail when plumbers clear them.
    Last edited by Ian Gills; 10-27-2010 at 07:19 AM.

  10. #10
    DIY Junior Member Bob_of_Maine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    11

    Default

    I had a piece of 1.5" copper drain from a kitchen sink fail by corrosion at the bottom of the pipe. The corrosion kept thinning it until it got so thin that the residual fabrication stresses caused it to fold and crack. The water isn't bad (lake water), dishwasher and disposer on system, and no other pipes failed.

  11. #11
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,638

    Default

    ANy good plumber can replace those gaskets without going behind or under the tub. It depends on how much peace of mind it gives you to do it now or not. I have NOT seen a tub with an access panel, or installed one, in almost 50 years, unless the house was from the 40's when they did install them, (often inside a kitchen cabinet that you cannot get to it anyway, even if you did need that access).
    Last edited by hj; 10-28-2010 at 06:57 PM.

  12. #12
    DIY Junior Member turbocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Colorado USA
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    ANy good plumber can replace those gaskets without going behind or under the tub. It depends on how much peace of mind it gives you to do it now or not. I have NOT seen a tub with an access panel, or installed one, in almost 50 years, unless the house was from the 40's when they did install them, (often inside a kitchen cabinet that you cannot get to it anyway, even if you did need that access).
    hj, hey, not arguing just asking but how would anyone change the gaskets there without going behind or under the tub? Even if you could somehow squeeze out the one there at the drain selector, you couldn't unscrew the ABS's compression nuts and compression ferrules unless I'm misunderstanding what you wrote? Can you clarify that? Thanks.

  13. #13
    In the Trades Jerome2877's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    384

    Default

    He's talking about the overflow gasket and the one under the drain that go's between the tub and the 90.

  14. #14
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    The overflow gasket costs just a couple of bucks. Very easy to replace either from the tub side or, with rear access.
    Leave the rest of the drain alone unless it has a problem.

  15. #15
    DIY Junior Member turbocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Colorado USA
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood View Post
    The overflow gasket costs just a couple of bucks. Very easy to replace either from the tub side or, with rear access.
    Leave the rest of the drain alone unless it has a problem.
    Ahaa! Got it now! I can totally see that it is easy enough to replace the overflow gaskets from either side, but I couldn't figure out how to do the drain sections without removing wallboard. You also answered my drain question too and as always I'll follow the experts' advice about these things ... and in this case ... it aint broke, so I aint fixin it!

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-09-2010, 06:44 PM
  2. Toto "Drake" Installation Question
    By Henry G in forum Toilet Forum discussions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-10-2010, 02:35 PM
  3. "Machine Gun" or "Thud" and a Weeping Toilet...oh my!
    By maxxis in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-22-2009, 07:38 PM
  4. Difference between "thinset" and "dryset" mortar...?
    By Fistor in forum Remodel Forum & Blog
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-31-2008, 02:44 PM
  5. "S" trap to drain pipe fitment question
    By TSPORT in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-03-2005, 05:30 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •