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Thread: Kitchen Sink Vent Question

  1. #1

    Default Kitchen Sink Vent Question

    Hi. I am undertaking a kitchen remodel and found a small surprise when I pulled out my old cabinets. I intent to put the sink basically in the same location as the old one but need to move the drain about 2 feet over as the original location was actually in the cabinet next to the sink! Also the tie in to the vent stack seems to be an after thought of a previous reno as it is only notched into the wall. I want to fix the notches to bring this wall back to code. My question is how best to vent this sink?
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  2. #2
    DIY Member GregO's Avatar
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    Default redo

    Moving it 2 feet the right, I hope? I would rip off all the drywall to inspect and allow for reinsulating, then I'd cut out all the piping and repipe it after framing in another interior wall. Best to do it properly now and once while you have the chance. While it looks like it should vent fine, that looks like a mess of poor piping and notched studs, making me cringe. Greg

    On second glance, what the heck is that lower right black pipe?

    Quote Originally Posted by tlademann View Post
    Hi. I am undertaking a kitchen remodel and found a small surprise when I pulled out my old cabinets. I intent to put the sink basically in the same location as the old one but need to move the drain about 2 feet over as the original location was actually in the cabinet next to the sink! Also the tie in to the vent stack seems to be an after thought of a previous reno as it is only notched into the wall. I want to fix the notches to bring this wall back to code. My question is how best to vent this sink?
    Last edited by GregO; 07-09-2008 at 05:41 AM.

  3. #3

    Arrow feedback on redo

    I was actually hoping to move the drain a couple feet left - to keep it all in the Sink cabinet (which is a 36in cabinet where the water feeds are) rather than have to run across into the cabinet next to the sink.

    When you say reframe - are you talking about reframing the entire wall?

    The pipe in the lower right is a tie in to the stack from a drain in the basement. The outside wall that you see here is sitting on top of the concrete basement wall and therefore connections from directly below here can not come straight up into the stud cavity

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default pipes

    It comes up from downstairs but where does it connect TO? It cannot just stick up out of the floor. As for the other questions, how you modify the drain and vent may be determined by how the cabinets are designed. Whether they provide room behind them for the lateral line to connect or if you have to notch them into the wall.

  5. #5

    Smile Downstairs Pipe

    The pipe coming up from downstairs goes into the wall and up the stud cavity at the far right - it proceeds about 1 foot above the open drywall in the picture and forks in with the stack line from the sink into one pipe that leads to the roof.

    The cabinets are already purchased (Ikea). My current idea is one of the following:
    1. Fir out a couple of feet and run the extended pipe stack in a similar manner as the one that is notched (after fixing the notches with some metal plates)
    OR
    2. Remove the stack line for the sink (leaving the one for the basement intact) and use an AAV for the kitchen sink cleaning up the entire mess.

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    An inspector would likely only allow an AAV if there was no other way to do it correctly (which you have).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7

    Default Thanks Jim ... so choose the firing out method?

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    An inspector would likely only allow an AAV if there was no other way to do it correctly (which you have).
    You would then be ok with firring out the wall and putting the line in there?

  8. #8
    DIY Member GregO's Avatar
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    Default reframe

    You could reframe the entire wall by framing another inside of the existing one or you could frame a "knee wall" where the base sticks out farther than the top, allowing you to more easily conceal the plumbing (for strength and insulation, though, I'd add another interior wall as mentioned - I'm not a fan of notching or drilling framing or joists even when meeting code). A knee wall could be built at cabinet height or higher depending on countertop design/preference, though. Greg

    Quote Originally Posted by tlademann View Post
    I was actually hoping to move the drain a couple feet left - to keep it all in the Sink cabinet (which is a 36in cabinet where the water feeds are) rather than have to run across into the cabinet next to the sink.

    When you say reframe - are you talking about reframing the entire wall?

    The pipe in the lower right is a tie in to the stack from a drain in the basement. The outside wall that you see here is sitting on top of the concrete basement wall and therefore connections from directly below here can not come straight up into the stud cavity
    Last edited by GregO; 07-09-2008 at 09:41 AM.

  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks for the advice. I ripped down the drywall below the window on this entire wall and think that the knee wall approach will work the best for me. One last question - the current stack seems to be a smaller pipe than the line that was used to run to it. Is there a reason that the feed from the drain line is larger or can I reduce it right away while it travels horizontally to the stack?

  10. #10
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    Never reduce a drain line or you'll introduce places for clogs to form. The vent line, moving just air, often can be smaller.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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