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Thread: Lower Power element for small GE water heater?

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  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member sedin26's Avatar
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    Default Lower Power element for small GE water heater?

    I have a 10 Gallon GE Smartwater Electric Water Heater with a single 1500W element. I'm using a micro-hydro power system that used to run this ok but, for reasons I won't get into, the capacity is reduced and I now don't have enough power to sustain the 1500W load.

    I'm wondering if it is possible to get a lower wattage element to use? I do realize that this would take a lot longer to heat the water but that isn't really a concern as long as I can actually run it.

    I may be able to use a 1000W element but even lower would be nice.

  2. #2
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default element

    750 watts is the smallest 115v element.

  3. #3
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    The simplest solution would be to wire a high-current diode in one leg (the hot leg) of the circuit. That would limit the power to half the cycle and would nominally deliver half the power. The inertia of the hydropower rotor system should be able to smooth out the speed without any problem.

    If you have a 120 Volt system you are using about 12.5 Amps. I would get at least a 25 Amp diode rated for at least 200 Volts Peak Inverse Voltage (more is better).

    I did a search at DigiKey.com on the first link plugging in 25 Amps as the current value. One of the selections is a 25 Amp diode with 600 PIV rating for $5.67. Maybe you could find something at an electronics store but I didn't find any at www.RadioShack.com

    http://search.digikey.com/scripts/Dk...keywords=diode

    http://www.vishay.com/docs/93506/9350625f.pdf

    EDIT: hj's response came in while I was searching. If you can get a 750 Watt element that is the cleanest solution.
    Last edited by Bob NH; 05-30-2008 at 09:29 PM. Reason: New Info from other post

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member sedin26's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies. The 750W element sounds like it would be ok for my situation. Interestingly, this thread already comes up third on google when searching for 750w 115v element

    My next problem - I'm in the sticks so would prefer to source this on the net but I don't see anywhere to grab one. Any ideas on that?

    Would a plumbing supply house have one or perhaps Home Depot?

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default element

    Any place that handles elements can order one. They are too small to be a normal stock item, in most cases. You should also be able to locate one online. Graingers.com will have them, but usually only sell to licensed contractors

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member sedin26's Avatar
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    I haven't been able to find any of these online anywhere so I will try to call "local" supply houses (I'm not exactly close to anhing though)

    Any chance one of you has seen one of these online somewhere?

  7. #7
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Keep in mind that a hair dryer or toaser is using about 1200 to 1500 watts, so 750 watts is pretty minimal for a water heater , but it would eventually heat the water .

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