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Thread: Vessel Sink Drain that prevents overflow

  1. #1

    Default Vessel Sink Drain that prevents overflow

    I was watching the DIYnetwork's Bathroom Renovations with Amy Matthews and they had an episode where they installed a vessel sink. It was episode 210-213 the Spa Retreat makeover. Anyway, they showed a drain for the vessel sink that you could pull up a few inches, maybe 2 or 3 and the water would only fill to the top of the drain cap and stop. I have not been able to find this drain anywhere. I wrote to the show and told them the exact episode and they still could not find the maker of the drain. Can anyone assist?

    You can see the drain if you go to the link below for Bathroom Renovations and then click the BlasCB Bath Becomes Spa Retreat video.


    HELP! Thank you.
    Last edited by Terry; 01-14-2010 at 09:37 AM.

  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member taysan's Avatar
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    Do you mean the flow of water would stop or that the drain essentially extended the drain pipe up into the sink so the water would pool around the drain until it reached a level where it began to actually drain?

    Seems like you could fill your sink with a few inches of water with any kind of drain - what is it about this one that you are interested in? Just trying to understand the mechanics of the drain.

  3. #3

    Default Drain

    It allows you to fill the sink until it reaches the top of the cap which extends up from the drain 2 or 3 inches, then once the water reaches that point it drains. It bascially makes a vessel sink without overflow into a sink with overflow.

    I'm interested because I have not seen a single drain similar, with vessel sinks you either have a drain that alwas drains or one that when the pop up is pushed down it fills the sink, but nothing stops it from overflowing.

  4. #4
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    That is not how that drain works.
    The reason it pulls up so high, is to allow enough air in the drain.
    If you have a vessel sink without an overflow, the capillary action of the water causes it to cling to the grids in the drain.
    The high pop-up lets the water fall down the drain better.

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member taysan's Avatar
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    I guess people who buy vessel sinks are presumed to be more careful than those of us who stick with traditional sinks with overflows. That being said, some vessel sinks do in fact have overflows.

    So it would seem that most any drain specifically made for a vessel sink would do this.

  6. #6
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    So it would seem that most any drain specifically made for a vessel sink would do this.
    Do what?

    All lavs "with" overflows drain better, or maybe I should say normal.
    Lavs without overflows have problems draining, and they can overflow
    That's two problems wrapped up in one nice package.
    A workaround for the slow drain problem, is the have the stopper pull up quite a ways, to let more air down the drain.
    A grid drain literally does not suck, However, they do suck at draining.

    There are vessels with overflows, but they are rare.

  7. #7

    Default Drain

    If any of you saw the episode you would see how it works and it's not how I guess I am describing because no one is getting it. The drain pulls up to a height of about 2 or three inches, this allows the water to fill in the vessel up to that point and then drains once it reaches that height. Someday I guess this will be the norm for this type of sink since it seems like the perfect solution, but today I guess only one company is making it and no one has seen it yet.

  8. #8
    Plumbing Contractor srdenny's Avatar
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    The best lift and turn drains used to be made by Kohler (K-2710). Unfortunately, they've recently discontinued them. Mountain Hardware offers a drain set up that adds an overflow to the sink. Kind of like the set up that Dumont supplies with their Corian sinks. I recently drilled out a couple of granite vessels and rigged them up with the Mountain product. Nice. Unfortunately, the exterior overflow doesn't look too pretty on a vessel that top mounts.

  9. #9

    Default No luck so far

    I've spent months now searching the internet for this drain and sent multiple emails to the diynetwork to no avail. I think it's the one product they have no idea where it came from. Wish I could contact the home owners. The only thing I can think of is it came with the sink they bought or the design is so poor it never made it to real mass production.

    If someone who reads this sees the episode or watches the video on the Bathroom Renovations web site you'll think, oh that's what that idiot on Terry love's Foum was talking about.

    Thank you for your assistance.

    It would be a good product for those vessels lavs, Terry
    Last edited by Terry; 06-12-2008 at 02:02 PM.

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