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Thread: table saw question

  1. #16

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    I do dig those rearmounted motors. They allow a dual bevel too.

    You should check out the Makita 12"SCMS. The most recent issue of Fine Wood Working did a comparison of 12" sliders and this one rated highest (the Bosch was a close second).

    The past 3-4 years, the Mak and the Bosch have run neck and neck in the SCMS category.

    Either co makes fantastic products.
    (important note: I'm not a pro)

  2. #17
    DIY Junior Member Marv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo View Post
    I have a left index finger which points just a little east of straight ahead! And that was done with a hand saw! Just think what I could do with a power saw!
    I bought a new hand saw a couple of years ago. Small blade and extremely sharp. While building a Habitat house, I cut myself about 4 times with it. Very embarrasing!

  3. #18
    DIY Junior Member Marv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey View Post
    Yeah, but how about a compound miter for an outside corner on a 16' length of crown molding?
    In Fine Homebuilding, I saw a guy make his own wood miter box to hold 14" crown and then cut it with a hand saw.

  4. #19
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
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    Default The ultimate safe table saw

    I still don't believe this:

    http://www.sawstop.com/

    Watch the "Hot Dog" video first... then the "Why SawStop" for some amazing statistics.
    Last edited by Mikey; 05-12-2008 at 03:26 PM.

  5. #20
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    It works, I've seen it at a trade show. They tried to sell it to saw manufacturers. I think they eventually ended up building their own with it in it. There was an article in Popular Science years ago.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #21
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
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    You're right - they build the entire saw, and claim it's the best saw out there, even not considering the safety of it. From what I've seen, I believe them. It's pretty pricey, but if you run a cabinet shop, it doesn't take too many 6-figure lawsuits to justify $3K for a top-notch saw.

  7. #22
    DIY Junior Member Marv's Avatar
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    It works, I've seen it at a trade show. They tried to sell it to saw manufacturers. I think they eventually ended up building their own with it in it. There was an article in Popular Science years ago

    I'll bet they didn't demonstrate it very often. It is a big job and big bucks to replace the locking mechanism after it kicks in.

  8. #23

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    I didn't think the locking mechanism needs replacement. The blade certainly does, though.

    They just came out with an 'economy' contractor saw for the bargain price of $1800!!! They're also working on bandsaw and chopsaw.

    A lot of tablesaw haters also like the Eurekazone system (www.eurekazone.com) . It's basically a system of rails and guides that converts your circular saw to a tablesaw/radial/panel saw replacement. By keeping the wood stationary and moving the blade (facing down) the cuts are safer.

    The system works well for the space-constrained. Highly portable.
    (important note: I'm not a pro)

  9. #24
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marv View Post
    I'll bet they didn't demonstrate it very often. It is a big job and big bucks to replace the locking mechanism after it kicks in.
    Not so. $69 for the new "cartridge", which is the brake assembly, and it's a 2-minute job to replace it. I'm not even sure you'd have to replace the blade, although they say you do.

  10. #25

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    Hmm, $70, a new blade, and the time to replace everything is worth me keeping my fingers.

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