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Thread: table saw question

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  1. #1
    DIY Member shluffer's Avatar
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    Default table saw question

    I'm hoping that this post doesn't go awry of the rules. If it does, I apologize in advance.

    I'm looking to purchase a table saw and I am trying to choose between the Bosch 4000-09 and the 4100-09. the only difference I can figure out is that the new one has a slightly more powerful motor, and a new blade guard system. Has anyone used the new one? I found the older model at a large discount so it will run be about half the price of the newer model. Unless the new "safety" features are vastly superior I can't imagine spending the money on the newer model. Anyone have advice on this?

    Secondly, in the past I have used a radial arm saw and circular saws to do all my cuts. I would like a good book on table saw safety and technique. Can anyone suggest one?

  2. #2
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
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    My neighbor has the 4000-09 and I've got a 4100-09. At the time, I was able to buy the 4100 on the Web at the same price as the 4000 (which was on sale locally). If the 4000 were available for 1/2 the price of the 4100, it'd be a no-brainer. The improved safety features on mine are safely stored away in their holders; didn't know about the more powerful motor. The main reason I bought it was for the stand.

    As for the book, there's a ton of them out there. Taunton Press would be a good place to start.

    If you've used circular saws and radial arm saws in the past, I think you'll find a table saw doesn't replace either one well. I use it mostly for ripping small (say, less than 4' length) stock. For long rips, I still use a circular saw and a straightedge guide. For that reason alone, I wouldn't spend a lot of money on a table saw. (However, if you're getting into the cabinetmaking game, then a high-quality table saw (not the Bosch 4x00) is indispensable.) For crosscuts, a compound miter saw. If I were going to buy any new saws, I'd look seriously at the Bosch 5412L Dual-Bevel 12" Slide Miter saw -- Oh! the temptation!.

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    Last edited by Mikey; 05-11-2008 at 04:28 AM.

  3. #3
    DIY Member shluffer's Avatar
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    I don't plan on getting into cabinetmaking. I will likely build some radiator covers, but this saw should be fine for that. I was considering a stationary TS, but I realized that I don't have the space. As a saw that stows away goes, I think this is about as good as they get. As for a miter saw, I was planning on getting the Hitachi C12LSH 12" Sliding Dual Compound Miter Saw. I found it for a good deal ($500).

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    That's a good reply from Mikey. I don't have either, so I would comment that in general, I have often snapped up a closeout deal on a model which is being discontinued for a newer one.

    I subscribe to the Consumer Product Safety Commision recall list. I get emails every day about product recalls. As far as I know, there have been NO issues with these saws. For casual work, the motor in the older model is probably more than adequate for you. I hate to admit or encourage this, but for myself, and I think many, the blade guards, etc, on table saws are usually the first thing to go. They are cumbersome and interfere with a lot of work, and are too much trouble to take on and off!

    A table saw may be potentially the most dangerous tool in your shop. So treat it with respect when you operate it.

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default saw

    In the shop the table saw is the most dangerous tool. On the job, the most dangerous ones are circular saws with the guard locked back with a nail.

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Agree for sure with that. I mentioned taking off my table saw guard, but I would NEVER mess with the blade guard on circular saw. I suspect the two most common, or at least most serious, jobsite injuries treated by emergency rooms involve circular saws and nail guns.

  7. #7
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    In the shop the table saw is the most dangerous tool.
    I have a weird-shaped right thumb to attest to that .

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