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Thread: Challenge routing kitchen sink vent around window

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member codys's Avatar
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    Default Challenge routing kitchen sink vent around window

    I have new construction and have planned my kitchen sink centered on a window. The bottom of the window (the sill) is meant to be set 4" above counter height or top of sink height.

    Since the vent is supposed to go 6" above sink height before turning horizontally (or so I understand), I may have a problem -- that would put my vent pipe where the window is supposed to be.

    Can the vent pipe run at a diagonal (sloped up at least 45 degrees) to avoid interfering with the window? Or can it be run two feet left or right of the centerline of the double kitchen sink to avoid the window (that would require a longer horizontal run from P-trap to drain)? Any other ideas?

    Thank you for your help!!

  2. #2
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Default

    Vents can be routed almost any way necessary as long as the have an upward slope. Length is not a consideration.

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    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking question for you

    I dont kow where you live, but in many areas you cam simply use an
    Auto air vent under the sink and totally eliminate even running a vent for the the kitchen.

    if its ok in your region, then its ok to do and save all the trouble.

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default vent

    How about doing it right, not just the easy way? You an either run the vent on a 45, or even a 60 which is sometimes easier, or put the vent to the side of the window and arm over to the sink. It is done both ways.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member codys's Avatar
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    Default No Studers, but what about Code?

    Thank you both for the quick useful replys. Studer valves (or atmospheric vents) are not legal in Wyoming (Natroan County), but that would ave made it easier.

    My plumber claims the vent stack from p-trap to 6" above rim must be a vertical stack per code. I cannot see why from a physical standpoint and cannot find reference to this in code exerpts I have located. Can you say with authority that the 45 or 60 degree runs (upto 6" above rim)are fine?

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default vent

    The code says that to eliminate the possibility of water borne debris, due to a drain backup, obstructing the vent, it cannot be installed horizontally unless it is a minimum of 6" above the overflow rim of the fixture, but since the inspectors have no control over whether a kitchen sink, (36" high), might be connected at a future date, 42" has been established as the minimum height for a horizontal vent. A vent on a 45 or 60 degree angle has no possibility for debris to enter it and not "fall back out" when the water recedes so it is acceptable, and I have installed hundreds, if not thousands, of them this way. But since a 2'-3' "dirty arm" will be flushed by the sink usage, installing the drain and vent line next to the window and running a horizontal arm to the sink is also acceptable, and I have probably done as many installations this way as the former. Which of the two is done, and sometimes it is a combination of both, usually depends on where the drain connection to the main system will be and where the sink is located relative to it.

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member codys's Avatar
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    Default Thanks for the great final answer

    Thank you! Let's consider this issue closed.

  8. #8
    Plumber Plumber2000's Avatar
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    Depending on what code you use, here to run the vent below the window sill where it will not be 6" above the flood level rim of said sink, we can use long radius 90 turn/s for the vent if below the flood level rim, ask inspector if they allow what I just said.

    Slope is not a factor here, vents can be run flat on the horizontal.

    Again asking on line about a code related question, you will get many and they will all seem different.

    Good Luck
    Plumber for 20+years

  9. #9
    Plumber RioHyde's Avatar
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    Run the drain and vent beside the window and arm over to the kitchen sink.

  10. #10
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking if it works , and its code, then its right.

    Doing it right is a matter of where you live , I guess.

    Their are many ways to skin a cat.

    To me , its just COMMON SENSE to skin the cat

    as quickly and efficiently as possible in an attempt to

    maximize profit on the job too.

    Though, I suppose that a homeowner isnt really worried about profit,

    but maybe his time could be valuable to him.

    Spending the day drilling 1 1/2 holes through 2x4s to vent to something
    doesent sound like fun to me, especially if it isnt necessary.

    Auto air vents are code in most metro places like Denver Colorado and most of the Rockies., which is failry close to his location.

    I also would guess if he went to the local Lowes in his area, they are available and are sold every day to unsuspecting customers, code or not.

    eventually they will be considered legal throughout all 50 states because they work just fine.

    I am not telling anyone to break the local codes, but dont make a project out of something that doesent have to be,

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    If a profit and saving loads of time are not a concern ,

    why not thread 1 1/2 galvanized pipe ???

  11. #11
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default pipe

    cut and thread 1 1/2" galvanized pipe? What does that have to do with this subject?

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    Plumber RioHyde's Avatar
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    Mark is correct that there are many ways to skin a cat. Sure the AAVs are allowed by most localities now, but code is the minimum standard. In my own house I have done extensive remodeling/renovation and have refused to use an AAV anywhere in it. It isnt that big of a deal (speaking for myself that is) to drill the 2-9/16" holes where needed and tie into a vent stack. AAVs do have their place in certain applications, but if the wall is already open and a vent was already planned, running the riser up by the window and arming over to the k/s just doesnt seem like something out of the ordinary.

  13. #13
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Default

    It hardly takes any time to put in the needed holes. Maybe a minute or two.

    And the little bit of pipe and fittings are less money than a Studor Vent.

  14. #14
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default holes

    Since he was talking about it taking a whole day, maybe he is using a brace and bit to drill them. But then, if he were Amish, he would not be trying to find a quick and dirty way to do it in the first place.

  15. #15
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking Amish plumber??

    I never thought of that , they would probably not even use
    normal electircal work tools either....

    now that would really make the plumbing experience more of a manhood contest , wouldent it??

    Perhaps I am just lazy. Perhaps I have drilled my fair share of KNOTS in wood and I have had to pull enough nails out of the way to build a house with.

    Ever been jaw jacked and knocked off a ladder by a milwaukee drill when it caught a nail, ect??

    It always seemed to me that whenever I had to drill holes through doubled up 2x4s it never failed that the absolute only place you could drill, some carpenter decided to sink an extra couple of nails , somehow he just knew to do it.

    anyway , wether you do the absolute minimum or the maximum it still is going to function properly

    its all just a matter of how much time , labor and materials you wish to sink into the project.

    its just my personal choice how to get things done, maybe I am just getting older.....
    call me lazy, call me half assed.... its ok with me.

    the stuff still flows down hill either way.

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