(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Changing receptacle

  1. #1

    Question Changing receptacle

    I am changing one of the outlets in my kitchen. It is a kind i have never seen before where the wires push in from the back and are somehow locked in. Perhaps by a small metal tab on each side. Just wanted to check on proper way to remove so i don't damage anything.

  2. #2
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,686

    Default

    You're on target. Near where the wire is pushed in, there will be a small slot with a brass spring visible down in the slot. That spring digs into the wire to make the "back-stab" connection. Usually there's a stamped marking of "Press to release" or "Press spring thru slot to release wire" or something like that. With a small screwdriver, do just that -- press the brass spring, to move it away from the wire and it will release. Sometimes it's easier if you first push the wire in a bit to allow the spring to "un-dig" itself from the wire.

  3. #3
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,654

    Default outlet

    If the wire will not release when the spring is depressed, just twist the outlet back and forth on the wire while pulling on it.

  4. #4
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    9,001

    Default

    1. Don't use that type again....they are notoriously unreliable , especially on a device which might have a toaster or coffe pot plugged in. Get the type where the wire goes straight in and is clamped when you tighten the screw.

    2. If you do get the wire out of the old one, make sure there is no nick in it, which might cause it to break. You can't go wrong by cutting the old bare section off, and restripping.

  5. #5
    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Litchfield, CT
    Posts
    608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo View Post
    1. Don't use that type again....they are notoriously unreliable , especially on a device which might have a toaster or coffe pot plugged in.
    Any proof of that or just opinions?

  6. #6
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    9,001

    Default

    They are still legal for 15 amp circuits only. For many years, they have been required to exclude 12 gauge wire. I think that tells the story. Lots of folks use them because they are fast. In your own house, you get to choose.

  7. #7
    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Litchfield, CT
    Posts
    608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo View Post
    They are still legal for 15 amp circuits only. For many years, they have been required to exclude 12 gauge wire. I think that tells the story. Lots of folks use them because they are fast. In your own house, you get to choose.
    I dont backstab just for the record, but I dont hold it against people that do either...

  8. #8
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NY State, USA
    Posts
    975

    Default

    It's so well documented that backstabbing is failure prone it's not funny.
    I am frankly surprised it is still legal.

  9. #9
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,523

    Default


  10. #10
    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Litchfield, CT
    Posts
    608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    It's so well documented that backstabbing is failure prone it's not funny.
    I am frankly surprised it is still legal.

    Who did the documentation? and for what its worth Ive seen just as many bad splices as bad backstabbing, maybe we should not make splices legal either..

  11. #11
    Electrical Contractor sbrn33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fremont, NE
    Posts
    31

    Default

    If you stick up for backstabbing you either just like to argue or have never done service work for more than a week.
    Just my opinion of course

  12. #12
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    9,001

    Default

    This is kind of like the plumbing arguments over AAV's and Sharkbites. They are code approved in many area. Folks have personal opinions about them, often based on personal experiences.

    In all walks of life, professionals develop certain habits and preferences, and we will probably debate the issues forever. Putty or silicone??

  13. #13
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,405

    Default

    My personal thoughts...

    When used with a high current device, the spring pressure able to be exerted on the back-stabbed device decreases as the junction heats and cools. Eventually, it doesn't have as much pressure as when new. Then things start to get interesting. If used to just power a lamp or something, you may never notice, when used with say a toaster, you might. Better to use a screwed down clamp in my unprofessional view.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  14. #14
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    Please understand that this is not directed to anyone person but instead to the market in general.

    Based on information that can be obtained from the CPSC and UL the installation of the stab-loc on 15 amp rated devices is as safe as any other type of installation.

    It has been my experiences of over 40 plus years in the field and 8 plus in the classroom that most people donít understand the failure of the device in the event one fails.

    According to recorded statistics there are two reasons that the stab-loc fails. First and foremost is due to improper installations procedures and second is due to overload of the device. Failure due to overload will eventually end up with failure somewhere else in the device or circuit if not at the stab-loc.

    Then we have the electrician or installer that just doesnít know any better that just blames the failure on the installation procedure instead of the real problem. This is due to the lack of knowledge and a need to blame something in order to affirm their knowledge when this knowledge is absent. This is when we hear things like, ďthis guy is nothing but a hack or I would never do anything like this.Ē

    When I hear these types of statements I canít help but wonder if the person making these statements thinks their knowledge and experience is far superior to those of Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories which approves the procedure.

    I also find that the electrician or installer that thinks that the stab-loc is a substandard installation are the same people that will spread the prongs of a male plug in order to get it to hold in a receptacle that is very loose. They donít seem to understand that the receptacle that is loose is failing at the tension spring just as the stab-loc failed. They donít understand that this loose receptacle is failing for the same reason that stab-loc fails. The loose receptacle is failing due to the device being overloaded.

    A close study of Table 210.21(B)(2) will reveal to the reader that any 15 receptacle is to be loaded to a maximum of 12 amps no matter if it is installed on a 15 or 20 amp circuit. To connect a 1500 watt electric heater to this device for an extended amount of time will cause the device to fail. This failure will occur either in the blade slot or the stab-loc if used. Did the device fail due to the installation procedure of due to being overloaded?

    Knowledge is power and power is the key to diagnosing a device failure. Without the proper knowledge one could simply make the statement that the electrician that made the installation was nothing but a money hungry hack and I am so much better than that hack.
    Myself I prefer to have the knowledge to properly access the failure and give the customer the correct reason for the failure instead of trying to make myself look better than someone else with false information.

  15. #15

    Default

    The best device connection is the screw and plate method found on recent GFCI receptacles and hospital grade receptacles. The around the screw is next, but its durability depends on the skill level of the electrician(or handyman). The stab-in or quick slot is worst. Here is the Question; What is the recommended torque for a receptacle screw?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •