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Thread: Need to re-route plumbing in kitchen

  1. #1

    Default Need to re-route plumbing in kitchen

    I gutted my kitchen for remodeling. As it happend, the previous owner placed the hot and cold water lines far from where the sink actually was and ran exposed lines along the perimeter of the wall where the line comes out from to the wall where the sink is. (they were in the cabinets essentially)

    So I do not have to cut into our new cabinets I want to place the plumbing in the wall. So essentially what I would be doing is removing the current plumbing and then place new lines directly to the wall where the sink would be instead of where the are now.

    However, where the kitchen is, running lines would be tricky as no basement is below it. At the same time, the previous owner has already ran a drain pipe where that wall is, so I know this is possible and I could probably follow the drain line to get to where I would like to go. (another reason to do this is because you can see the lines going into the basement at the trim of our living room)


    So, not knowing very much at all about plumbing - especially dealing with copper - I would like some online / real book references that I could go to/pick up and read.

    What are your suggested readings? more importanly, what are your tips?

    Tools I would need?

    In terms of my handyman skill - i would not say I know nothing, I know how to use what you would find in a tool box and I could probably tell you what tool is used for what job, but I would not be hired by a contractor either.

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    Depends somewhat on where you live and if it gets below freezing. Is this an outside wall? Running pipes on the inside has advantages - less likely to freeze and then split. Running copper through existing studs is not really feasible for a long run...but you could use PEX, which is flexible and could be threaded there. PEX is generally not affected by freezing (doesn't mean flow won't be stopped), but any connectors that freeze are fair game and could split.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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