(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Bathroom addition (New construction) - Toilet vent

  1. #1

    Default Bathroom addition (New construction) - Toilet vent

    I have added an addition onto the side of my house. The problem I am wrestling with is how to layout the waste/vent line for the toilet, sink and bathtub. I am located in New Jersey and the wall at the back of the toilet is a load bearing wall. The joists below are 12" TGI's 16" O/C. The walls are all framed in 2x4s.

    The wall behind the toilet and the wall to the right of the toilet are exterior walls.

    As you can see from the diagram, I would like to vent horizontally from the right side of the toilet and up the stud wall, but I am not sure I have enough space for the necessary 90 degrees to get up the stud wall (15"). The vents will then meet in the attic space as a 3" vent up through the roof.

    After I get your advice, I will layout the components and provide another picture.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    One who lurks Basement_Lurker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    668

    Default

    I don't follow you when you say that you don't have enough space for the necessary 90 degrees to get up the stud wall. Can you explain this a bit better?
    15" seems like a lot of room to work with.
    Broken promises don't upset me. I just think, why did they believe me? -Jack Handy


    www.blackbirdkitchenandbath.com

  3. #3
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    It looks like you are planning a heel elbow venying of the toilet.
    Don't go there!

    Wet vent it with the lav sink & vent the tub.

    You can only use the lo heel tee with the vent pointing up
    Last edited by Terry; 12-26-2008 at 12:35 PM.

  4. #4

    Default

    I went and picked-up several peices last night and then took some photos of the space. After gathering supplies I agree with you and believe the 15" is plenty of room. I have proposed two options.

    How would I wet vent? Are there any drawbacks?
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  5. #5
    Mechanical Engineer loafer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    49

    Default

    Doesn't the vent end of the low heal 90 have to be vertical?

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,602

    Default vent

    You probably will not be allowed to use that heel inlet quarter bend for the vent and even if you could, you shouldn't. There are many ways to do it correctly, but we do not have enough information as to how the pipes can be run below the floor, which will affect which is the better pipe arrangement.

    Last edited by Terry; 12-26-2008 at 12:35 PM.

  7. #7

    Default

    I would be glad to provide any additional information. What additional information is needed?

  8. #8
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,191
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default


    If you use a low heel tee like in your picture, it has to be treated as a santee fitting. That means the vent would be on top, the inlet would be on the side. Santees are mounted vertically.

    If you want to run your piping horizontally, then you would use a wye fitting. A wye could be a 3x2, with the 2" part of it rolled upward to keep it above the flow level of the waste line.
    Last edited by Terry; 12-26-2008 at 12:35 PM.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    If you want to run your piping horizontally, then you would use a wye fitting. A wye could be a 3x2, with the 2" part of it rolled upward to keep it above the flow level of the waste line.
    It looks from the pictures like this would probably all tuck nicely into one joist bay and work rather elegantly.

    One quick word of warning, though--if anything does have to pass through the joists, check the manufacturer's tables (looks like you have TJI-I think Weyerhauser makes the tables available online) for proper hole placement, since this bathroom is right over the bearing end. You have to stay a certain distance from the end with any penetrations to avoid compromising the structural integrity of the joist. The distance is a function of hole size (relative to joist height) and joist span.

    Props to the OP for the visio diagram and photos.

  10. #10

    Default Options again - Take 2

    Okay so I took all of the above advice last night, purchased some more connections and again have two options. The first option would have two vents, one from the w.c. and another from the lav. They would join together before going up into the attic.

    The other option uses a wet vent. (Are wet vents allowed in NJ?) I still have to turn to go up the middle stud bay because of wiring/medicine cabinet/etc.

    I have also included a picture of the tub drain. I do not believe there are any concerns here, but I figured I would post it. To connect this into the 3" drain should I use a Tee or a Wye?

    Thanks for the note on the TGIs. I had already gotten the specs on the holes and holes sizes and I adjusted the plan slightly to accomidate them. But if someone else uses this thread as a reference here is a link to my specific joists. (http://www.bc.com/wood/ewp/guides-re...AM-series.html)
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  11. #11
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    Option 1 shows an incorrect usage of a sani-tee on the lav sink drain.
    Option 2 is what I would go with. How it is done though is key to whether it is correct or not. Check with your local inspector to determine if wet venting is allowed.

  12. #12

    Default

    I just spoke with the plumbing inspector and a wet vent is allowed. As for the sani-tee I am not sure where the problem is beacuse the sani-tee is used in both areas. (Other than the fact that it is upside-down.) I have shown a close up image of the lav drain/vent in both situations.

    I would be coming off the front of the sani-tee into a P-Trap. Is it best to have the front of the P-trap be threaded or non-threaded (glue type)?
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  13. #13
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    In option 1 you were using a sani-tee horizontally to tie into the line from the toilet. That is not allowed! a wye and 45 el or, a combo should be used.

  14. #14

    Default

    Thanks for the clarification it looks like option two is the way to go. The first 90 of the vent will be at least 6" above the flood level of the lav. Are there any restrictions on the number of 90 degree turns on the vent? (I have to turn to move into the next stud bay and then turn go up into the attic and then up through the roof)

  15. #15
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    Make sure that 6" above flood level on the sink is okay with your inspector. Vents must maintain pitch just like a drain.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •