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Thread: 2 tanks/pressue switch

  1. #16
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    If you have to tell your Plumber what you learned here, perhaps you should be looking for a Well/Pump/Lady/Man to do the work. Obviously your plumber left you with a problem he didn't understand.

    bob...

  2. #17
    DIY Senior Member thassler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Annap_mike View Post
    Thank you.

    I will try tomorrow and keep my fingers crossed.

    Someone earlier had mentioned doing away with the low pressure switch and getting a normal pressure switch. Would that solve the problem or just delay having to adjust the pressue in the tanks?
    Usually, a low pressure switch is used when you have a low producing well and there's a chance that the water level could fall below the pump. If you're taking a shower and the water level drops below the pump, the system pressure drops and the low pressure switch trips - saving your pump. However, this setup only works if someone is using water at the time but it's better than nothing. A better approach is to use something like a PumpTec which monitors current/voltage and will cut the pump off at anytime it senses a problem.

    http://www.franklin-electric.com/Cat...nglePhase.aspx

    If there's no danger of the well running dry, I'd say you could safely replace the low-pressure with a standard pressure switch.

    ** Not a Pro **

  3. #18

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    I believe my well is in good shape( besides the high iron/sediment content). When we pull the pump- you can see the high water line is at least 20 feet above the pump. My well is about 50 ft

    Not sure why a low pressure switch was put on. I don't think the old switch was low pressure as i do not recall the lever but I can't be 100% certain since this was never an issue until the new tank..

    But if I do get the pressure in both tanks to be 5psi below the pump on setting- then the low pressure switch should not come on if indeed this is the problem.

    Or should I just have the new low pressure switch replaced with a regular switch?

    Thanks.

  4. #19
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    "I was watching the pressure gauge as my kids were taking a shower and it dropped to 40 then 30 then went all the way down to zero."

    You have to get this problem fixed so the pressure never falls below the ON pressure of the pump. If the pump comes on at 45, the pressure should never get below 45. Even Low pressure cut-off switches are not a problem when the pump comes on at 45 and the pressure goes up instead of down.

    Either you still have and air charge problem in the tanks, or the pump is not coming on at 45 as it should. It looks like you have a brass nipple going into the pressure switch so, it should not be clogged up like galv nipples get. Turn the power OFF, take the cover off of the pressure switch and take a close up picture of the wiring connections. It is possible that with the extra wires from the lightning arrester, the points could be pulled out of alignment. This could cause the points not to touch properly when the switch closes to start the pump.

    With the cover still off, turn the power back on. Be careful, that is 240 volts in that pressure switch. Hold the brass lever up until the pressure reaches about 45, then you should be able to turn it loose. Let the tanks fill and the pump shut off. Now open up some water somewhere and watch the points in the pressure switch. When the pressure drops to 45, the points should close. If they move at 45 but the pump does not start, try holding up the brass lever. You may find that the points are not touching good until you pull the lever. If this is the case, get a new pressure switch and your system will again be dependable. If the points touch good but the pump still does not start, you may have a loose wire somewhere.

  5. #20

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    Thanks will do so this evening after work, and baseball practice etc....

  6. #21

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    I have been asking questions under the possibility that I would need to remove air from one or both tanks to get thepressure in the tanks to fall below the pump cut- on point of 45psi.

    What if the pressure in the tanks is such that one or both are 10psi or more below the pump- cut -in already?. i.e tanks between 30-38psi and the pump cut-on is at 45psi. Is the key getting both tanks to be between 2-5 psi less than the cut-on pressure #?

    We are putting a normal pressure switch on this morning and adjusting the pressure. Not sure yet if we will add air to the tanks or adjust the switch #'s.

    Thanks.

  7. #22
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    As long as both tanks have less air than the pump start pressure, your OK. 2 PSI or 10 PSI is not that critical. Many times your tire pressure gauge and the gauge on the tank do not read the same. Check your tire pressure gauge against the gauge on the tank by checking the air while there is water pressure in the tank. If one gauge reads higher than the other, make note of that and adjust your air pressure accordingly.

  8. #23

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    if the tanks pressure are already below the cut-on point then what is causing this pressure drop to zero and having to re- set the pressure via the lever on the low-pressure switch.

    We are putting back on a normal pressure switch shortly. but if that solves it why would the pressure be dropping to cause the low pressure switch to have to be re-set. will a normal pressure switch also just drop to zero and then i have no way to easily re-set? will a normal switch mask the as of yet determined underlying problem

    And this pressure drop seems to happen after the water has been run in large quantities for a while( several showers, full bath tub, a couple loads of laundry etc..). The original theory behind installing the 2nd tank was to have a bigger water reserve on hand so the water and pressure would remain better longer even if for example 2 showers were running at the same time and someone flushed the toilet etc...
    .
    As i said- my well is 50 ft deep- the well high water line is about 20-22 feet above the pump so I don't think my well is running low.

    I keep coming back to the tanks but their pressure seems to be aleady below the cut-on.


    keep the advice coming- together we will solve this problem. Thanks

  9. #24
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    The extra tank is not going to help with pressure when there are two showers and other stuff going at the same time. The pump has to be able to keep up with what you are doing. The pressure should never drop below the ON pressure. Either your pump is not coming on when it is should, or the pump or well in not able to keep up with the amount of water you are using.

    Do you have any information on the pump? Or maybe the high iron and sediment problem has got the pump intake stopped up?

  10. #25

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    It is a brand new pump just installed this week. Not sure I really needed the new pump since one of the other problems turned out to be an exposed wire touching the ground wire at the well head. see my original post.

    It is Myers 4" submerisible pump.

    Ok- new settings tanks around 30psi. New cut-on 36 cutoff around 55psi.

    My plumber truly feels like it is a well issue . He recommended i keep the low pressure switch and begin a more conservative water usage routine until such time we want to consider a new deper well. He lowered the pressure settings a bit for that reason.

    Does his explanation make sense. I will also see if the new adjusted settings make any difference.

  11. #26
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    No his suggestion does not make sense. If your well were the issue, and he knew anything about pumps and wells, he could have checked for it. Since he didn't I will assume he is clueless.

    Try changing the switch, that's the cheapest and easiest way to do a minor check. If that don't work, we can tell you how to check your well if you so desire.

    bob...

  12. #27
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    If it is a weak well then you need to keep the Low pressure cut off switch. However, even a weak well should not be causing this problem the instant the pump starts. You have 22' of water in the well. The pump should come on and keep the pressure up until the 22' of water has been pumped out. Two pressure tanks means you have a little more water you can use before the pump even comes on. Then when the pump comes on, it should keep the pressure up at least for a few minutes until the well pulls down.

    The problem is still likely with the pump. Either the pump is not starting when it should, or the intake of the pump is clogged and won't let it pump enough water.

  13. #28

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    The pressure is now about 36-50 -I preferred the higher settings but his reasoning was it will save a bit of water at the lower settings.

    It seems multiple showers/baths in a row are what cause the the pressure to drop to zero. My wife did 2 loads of laundry to day and all was fine but the kids with back to back to back showers and/or tubs cause it drop and the water shuts off and I have to go down crawl under the steps and hit the reset lever on the pressure switch. I am not looking forward to doing that 350 times a year

    I am going broke solving my water problems. How can I check the health of the well and whether the aquifer is still supplying ample water.

    It just seems that since my problem is not solved, he has put it off on a well running dry.

    Thanks as always.

  14. #29
    DIY Senior Member thassler's Avatar
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    If you're running the well dry then maybe a Pumptec would be the best cure. It would save you having to crawl under the steps. They can be set to automatically restart after a certain time interval if they trip due to a low water event.

    ** Not a pro **

  15. #30
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    A Pumptec would be a good idea if your well is pulling down.

    If your thinking your well is pulling down, that would explain the low pressure cut off switch. If you want to check to see if that is the problem, you will have to explain what your well situation is. Do you see a pipe sticking up above ground? If so, describe it to the best of your ability, remove the cap and look down with a flashlight or mirror in the sunlight and tell us what you see.

    bob...

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