(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: fewest splices possible?

  1. #1

    Default fewest splices possible?

    When running a dedicated 20-amp circuit for a gas dryer I assume you should run the wire with the fewest splices possible. What's the actual code for this? The wire run is about 40 feet and I am thinking I will need at least one junction box.

    Thoughts, opinions?


    Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default

    There is no limit on the number of splices. A properly done splice will have resistance equal to an unspliced piece of wire. Electricians try to limit splices because they take time.

  3. #3

    Default thanks

    Thanks.

    I appreciate it. I don't mind taking the time and am very methodical and careful to make good splices.

  4. #4
    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Litchfield, CT
    Posts
    608

    Default

    You need a dedicated circuit for the laundry, but why do you feel you will need at least one splice?

  5. #5
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    2,523

    Default

    plug it into the same receptacle as the washing machine is plugged into

  6. #6

    Default splice

    I wanted a junction box to make the wire run easier since I am planning to do the run in sections. (Part of the run will be romex since it will be behind sheetrock.) The exposed parts will be EMT.

    I assume this is ok.

  7. #7

    Default

    Your splice should be mechanically and electrically secure prior to the application of the wire nut. Twist the bare wires.

  8. #8
    Electrical Contractor sbrn33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fremont, NE
    Posts
    31

    Default

    [QUOTE=ked;129283]Your splice should be mechanically and electrically secure prior to the application of the wire nut. Twist the bare wires.[/QUOTE

    Now why would you say something like that when you know it's not required or even recommended by the wire nut manufacturers. The whole idea of a wire nut is to have the spring do the work.

  9. #9
    Computer Systems Engineer jdoll42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    In Illinois near St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    68

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sbrn33 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ked View Post
    Your splice should be mechanically and electrically secure prior to the application of the wire nut. Twist the bare wires.
    Now why would you say something like that when you know it's not required or even recommended by the wire nut manufacturers. The whole idea of a wire nut is to have the spring do the work.
    I can't begin to tell you how many times I've seen wires fall out of the nut because they weren't twisted together first. I always twist my wires then nut them. Why risk a fire or something when you can just spend an extra 5 seconds twisting the wire together first?

    Also, at least for me, it's easier to get the nut on with the wires pre-twisted, especially when you are dealing with more than 2 wires. As ked said, just make sure they are mechanically secure before nutting them and you won't be sorry.

  10. #10

    Default

    I can't begin to tell you how many times I've seen wires fall out of the nut because they weren't twisted together first. I always twist my wires then nut them. Why risk a fire or something when you can just spend an extra 5 seconds twisting the wire together first?
    It's because the nuts weren't twisted on tight enough, not because the wires weren't pre twisted.

    In a proper installation the wires will twist inside the nut. Personally I think it is harder with 4 to 5 wires to get a good pre twist going. The outside ones tend to slip around the inside ones. If they are all laid in and held together with your fingers, the nut will keep them from splaying apart.

    Is that a word?...splaying???

  11. #11
    Computer Systems Engineer jdoll42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    In Illinois near St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    68

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alectrician View Post
    Personally I think it is harder with 4 to 5 wires to get a good pre twist going. The outside ones tend to slip around the inside ones. If they are all laid in and held together with your fingers, the nut will keep them from splaying apart.
    The local inspector told me to not have more than 3 (maybe 4) wires under a single nut for that exact reason. I designed my wiring in my house to keep multiple wire junctions to a minimum. In some remodel work I've done with the inlaws, they had some nuts with 5 or 6 wires each under them. I broke that mess up into several nuts with only 3 wires each. I just feel safer that way. That's my $0.02 worth. Everybody has their own methods and reasons. That's just mine!

  12. #12
    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY and Fire Island, NY
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    You'll run into box-fill issues, if you take that logic too far.

    Also, more connections = more things that can go wrong.

    As for pre-twisting, it can cause its own set of problems, since it doesn't force you to twist the nut hard enough (that sounds wrong, lol...). So your connection might be solid, but the nut fall off - leaving you with an exposed splice.

    Nothing wrong with 5 or 6 wires under a single nut, but it's got to be the right-sized nut (i.e., NOT a red forced on & tape around the exposed bits of wire).
    Master Plumber Mark:

    there is nothing better than the
    manly smell of WD 40 in the air
    while banging away on brass with a chisel and hammer...

    it smells like......victory......

    do not hit your thumb...
    __________________
    Just so everyone's clear: I'm the POODLE in the picture ("french", get it?) The hot woman is my wife.

  13. #13
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,687

    Default

    I just installed a bunch of new Halo ICAT fixtures that came with push-in splices already attached to the fixture wires:

    Name:  Ideal push-ins.jpg
Views: 137
Size:  5.2 KB

    (I'm not sure whose connector they used -- possibly OEMed.) Installing was a snap and very fast. I see a real problem if I ever need to change anything, but in this application it's not likely. Scuttlebutt from other forums is that they avoid the problems that gave backstab receptacles a bad name, and there's no twisting, etc.
    Last edited by Mikey; 03-16-2008 at 02:13 PM.

  14. #14

    Default

    In my class we have experimented with pre twisting. If you do not twist, the connection is weak especially if you are doing more than two wires. One wire can slide out when you are shoving the wires into the box. Some manufacturers say "no need to twist wires prior to application of the wire nut" on the box--some do not. Are you going to stop and read every box? Also, who will be called back to fix a dead circuit? Conclusion: Refer to the King, Chubby Checker: Come on Baby, Let's do the twist!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •