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Thread: PVC Pipe broken in wall at "T" connector

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member PabNYC's Avatar
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    Default PVC Pipe broken in wall at "T" connector

    This past weekend I was having new cabinets installed and the installer broke off the PVC pipe in the wall at the connector. He did not want to open up the wall to put in a new "T". Instead he used a roto bit and removed the broken piece out of the connection. Of course this is not a nice clean fit but the pipe does go in about an inch.

    I am a little concerned about the longevity of this repair. Since the cabinet is in place it would be even harder to open up the wall if necessary.

    Should I have faith in the connection? Get a rubber boot? Tear open the wall? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!

    Edited to add that the pipe that was broken is the waste line for the kitchen sink.

  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member Mike Swearingen's Avatar
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    PVC glue isn't actually glue. It is a chemical bond that actually "welds" the plastic.
    What he did should hold it fine. There's never any real "pressure" on a drain.
    Good Luck!
    Mike

  3. #3
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    In the unlike event that you have a leak, there are a couple of thing to try before ripping out the wall. First, remove the fitting and apply pipe compound to it. If that fails, you could remove the fitting and have the threads "chased" so the fitting will screw in deeper. That's not difficult to do if you have the die to do it, but as Mike said in the previous reply to your question, since there is no pressure on a drain, most likely there are enough threads catching already to prevent a leak. Good time to apply the axiom, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it!"

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default pvc

    If he used the proper bit, it would be almost a "perfect" fit and the pipe would enter the joint as far as he drilled the pipe, hopefully all the way to the bottom of the socket. The pipe and fitting have to have an "interference fit" in order to seal properly, so without knowing how he removed the pipe, we cannot tell if the fit was adequate to provide a good, long term seal.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member PabNYC's Avatar
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    He essentially ground out the old pipe slowly so it is not a perfect, or even close to perfect fit. It may be "good enough" but if there is a special bit that I can get from a plumbing supply to mill it out a little better I would buy it. .

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member mrjetskey's Avatar
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    I have had to re-use pvc fittings before,especially on a drain there is no pressure,but if you really want to get the inside connector smooth.You can use a 1" drum sanding roller on a dremel or if you dont own a dremel you can buy a drum sanding attachment for electric drill.It is a round shaped tube made of heavy sandpaper attached to a 6" metal rod that you can chuck up in your drill.If nothing else you can take a piece of 3/8" rod or tube or wood dowel and cut a slot in the end of it,cut a strip of coarse sandpaper about 1" wide by 6" long place the sandpaper in the slot,twist the rod while holding the sandpaper until it wraps around it,then use your drill to spin it ,as the outside sandpaper wears it will expose fresh sandpaper.

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