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Thread: 2-12gauge and a 14 gauge for ground?

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    Default 2-12gauge and a 14 gauge for ground?

    Is it okay for me to use two 12 gauge (for hot and neutral) and one 14 gauge wire for ground? I think 14 gauge is easier to work with but I don't want to violate code.

    I'm installing a dedicated circuit running EMT for a gas dryer.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trackerxx View Post
    Is it okay for me to use two 12 gauge (for hot and neutral) and one 14 gauge wire for ground? I think 14 gauge is easier to work with but I don't want to violate code.

    I'm installing a dedicated circuit running EMT for a gas dryer.

    Thanks.
    Wouldn't the EMT be the ground?

    If you install a wire for the equipment grounding conductor it MUST be a #12

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    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
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    No can do.

    Jason

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    DIY Member MarkHash's Avatar
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    I am sure it's against the code, but it would definitely carry the fault current long enough to pop the breaker, which is what it is there for. I'm sure there are deep reasons for like sized ground wires but it escapes me right now. Probably to make sure the circuit breaker operates properly in much larger applications.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    I don't know code, but I would use 12/3 color coded for 220VAC. (Red, Black, and Green) Of course electricity doesn't care what color the wire is, but if it had to be worked on in the future, it might help.

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    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart View Post
    I don't know code, but I would use 12/3 color coded for 220VAC. (Red, Black, and Green)
    For a GAS dryer?

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    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart View Post
    I don't know code, but I would use 12/3 color coded for 220VAC. (Red, Black, and Green)

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    For a GAS dryer?

    And I thought the 12 was a bit much... (I know its required....)

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    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart View Post
    I don't know code, but I would use 12/3 color coded for 220VAC. (Red, Black, and Green) Of course electricity doesn't care what color the wire is, but if it had to be worked on in the future, it might help.
    12/3 is ROMEX® and it contains a white, black, red and a bare ground. It's 4W, which most new dryers should be. For a 220VAC dryer this COULD be used, but generally they're at least 30A so a 10/3 would be used for the increased amperage. He also said that he's running EMT, so ROMEX® probably isn't the right choice. Lastly, a gas dryer is probably 120VAC.
    Last edited by Terry; 12-07-2011 at 10:35 AM.

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    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
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    Actually, I was thinking that he could supply a 15A breaker and then get away with it, but the more that I think about it, if you increase the current carrying conductor (say for voltage drop, for example), I'm pretty sure the ground needs increased too. The EMT could be used if its continous and contains any appropriate bonding jumpers.

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    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lakee911 View Post
    Actually, I was thinking that he could supply a 15A breaker and then get away with it, but the more that I think about it, if you increase the current carrying conductor (say for voltage drop, for example), I'm pretty sure the ground needs increased too. The EMT could be used if its continous and contains any appropriate bonding jumpers.

    210.11(C)(2) requires a 20 amp laundry circuit.

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    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lakee911 View Post
    Lastly, a gas dryer is probably 120VAC.
    THAT was my point!

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