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Thread: dryer vent

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member 7echo's Avatar
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    Default dryer vent

    I have been reading a lot of threads, just generally interested in this stuff and planning some remodel work shortly. I did a little searching on the issue, but can't find very many comments.
    Question concerning dryer venting-
    Is it OK to use cpvc for electric dryer venting? I have asked around a bit and read a little and am getting some wide ranging answers-i.e. 'Absolutely not, no way', to 'We use it regularly, it meets code here, and makes a nice, clean install.'
    Thanks in advance for commenting- Seven

  2. #2
    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7echo View Post
    I have been reading a lot of threads, just generally interested in this stuff and planning some remodel work shortly. I did a little searching on the issue, but can't find very many comments.
    Question concerning dryer venting-
    Is it OK to use cpvc for electric dryer venting? I have asked around a bit and read a little and am getting some wide ranging answers-i.e. 'Absolutely not, no way', to 'We use it regularly, it meets code here, and makes a nice, clean install.'
    Thanks in advance for commenting- Seven
    The best bet it would be to check the manufactures instructions... I always use rigid duct pipe myself...

  3. #3

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    Where do you find 4 inch CPVC?

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member 7echo's Avatar
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    Local supply house has 4" in stock, and will order 6" as needed, 2 day delivery, or so we have been told. We need some 6" for some large vacuum pump exhaust for a router and they said no prob. I hope there isn't some confusion because the pump exhaust can get hot.
    I figured for a dryer vent cpvc(more heat resistant) would be better than just pvc. We have steam bent wood parts in pvc steam boxes and they turned out to be definitely one time use, unless you needed a curved pipe : )

  5. #5
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Building codes I am familiar with prohibit any non metalic vents on dryers. You can't even use the 4" vinyl slinky tube that used to be common. Must be aluminum. The reason of course is fire. Dryers, including electric, do catch fire. They don't want the fire quickly expanding in the walls via the vent duct.

  6. #6

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    I currently have the old vinyl flex pipe coming off my dryer..does anyone know if this is against code in Georgia?

    I'm having someone replace 20 ft of the old vinyl stuff in my attic and he's charging $700. Does that sounds reasonable? How much would it cost for me to do it myself? I'm pretty handy, but I'm not familiar with code...

  7. #7
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default vent

    Depending on the attic $700.00 could be cheap, but for most situations it appears to be high, but it really depends on the individual situation which we cannot tell without being there.

  8. #8
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The solid, smooth walled ductwork will make the dryer run more efficiently - less restriction. The flex stuff tends to also fill up with lint, making it a fire hazard. It normally isn't a big deal to run the stuff. Material costs are low. It depends on where your terminal point is - wall or roof how complex it is to install, plus whether you have vinal siding or wood on the exterior. You'd need a pair of tin snips, and some of the metalized duct sealing tape (no screws to prevent catching lint). You can also use some hi-temp flue sealant, but that is probably overkill - the tape should suffice. I doubt there's more than $100 in materials, probably less. Now, crawling around in the attic, do it before summer!

    Depending on how the duct is run, you may need to play with walls if it is hidden, so that could start to add up with drywall, paint, etc. Lots of labor to make it look neat again, sometimes.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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