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Thread: What's wrong with this installation?

  1. #1

    Default What's wrong with this installation?

    Common mistakes, what are they?
    http://www.inspectpa.com/forum/forum.php
    My answers are based mostly on the ICC codes. Advice given is my personal opinion and every person performing work should acquire a permit from his/her jurisdiction and get the work inspected. My opinions are not directions to follow for DIYs or professionals

  2. #2
    DIY Junior Member bigbird's Avatar
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    I'm no plumber, but doesn't the cleanout have to be either vertical or at least slanted up on an angle?
    Is the cleanout plug glued in place?
    Why are there 2 electrical cables coming through the same opening as the pipe?
    Is that reducer in the right place? I would think it should be above the cleanout.
    I also see SM blue insulation on the wall (OK) but I don't know if styrofoam along the studs is OK.

  3. #3

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    The electrical is UF cable going to the septic dose tank.
    The cleanout is a common sense mistake but not a code issue.
    IRC applies to the 2 defects.
    Still looking for answers.
    http://www.inspectpa.com/forum/forum.php
    My answers are based mostly on the ICC codes. Advice given is my personal opinion and every person performing work should acquire a permit from his/her jurisdiction and get the work inspected. My opinions are not directions to follow for DIYs or professionals

  4. #4
    Geologist sjsmithjr's Avatar
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    Default

    - 3" cleanout on a 4" line.
    - Sanitee on back.

  5. #5

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    Still have one issue to fix........
    http://www.inspectpa.com/forum/forum.php
    My answers are based mostly on the ICC codes. Advice given is my personal opinion and every person performing work should acquire a permit from his/her jurisdiction and get the work inspected. My opinions are not directions to follow for DIYs or professionals

  6. #6

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    Yes, a santee on its back is a no-no. According to the UPC, a 3-1/2" cleanout is the minimum size for a 4" line.

    I don't like the reducing coupling, since I'd prefer a full 4" cleanout, and the installer should have thought of that. But we have this thing here about requiring a 4" pipe coming out of the building and many houses do not require the equivalent of 4" pipe based upon fixture units. So it's common to use a reducing coupling before the pipe goes through the foundation.

    There's a bit of confusion as to cleanouts since they require a cleanout outside the building and a horizontal pipe less than 5' does not require a cleanout. So, in theory, this cleanout going through the wall doesn't even have to be there, as long as there is one outside the building. I would prefer to have a two-way cleanout in the vertical pipe and a longsweep elbow to this type of setup.

  7. #7

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    The other item is that the foundation is not sleeved where the drain exits.
    http://www.inspectpa.com/forum/forum.php
    My answers are based mostly on the ICC codes. Advice given is my personal opinion and every person performing work should acquire a permit from his/her jurisdiction and get the work inspected. My opinions are not directions to follow for DIYs or professionals

  8. #8
    Geologist sjsmithjr's Avatar
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    New construction? Where I'm at that wouldn't have been a problem prior to 2007. Now; yes. I still want my secret decoder ring!

    -Sam
    Last edited by sjsmithjr; 02-20-2008 at 03:07 PM.

  9. #9
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default sleeve

    Unless the sleeve was inserted during the concrete pour, it is no more effective than just putting the pipe through the wall, and at least you don't have to try to seal two pipes instead of just one.

  10. #10
    DIY Senior Member construct30's Avatar
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    In the case of a clean out only with no pipe, why is the sanitary tee on its back so bad? I just had to ask the stupid question. You see it all the time in old plumbing. I've never seen a problem as a result. I agree with the idea of putting it on the verticle so it won't leak, but the straight shot for cleaning purposes is nice.

  11. #11

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    sanitary Tees can only be on their back for vents only. They are prone to clog. This should have been a wye.

    They were not designed to be on their back and the plumbing code (ICC/IRC) would required a wye.

    Through the foundation wall requires a sleeve.
    http://www.inspectpa.com/forum/forum.php
    My answers are based mostly on the ICC codes. Advice given is my personal opinion and every person performing work should acquire a permit from his/her jurisdiction and get the work inspected. My opinions are not directions to follow for DIYs or professionals

  12. #12
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Yes , but was it required when that building was built.

    If not the problem would be improper / non sealing of the pipe reguardless of the homes age and it would not be a code violation.

  13. #13
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking should have ...could have

    Idelally it would have been nicer to see a wye
    instead of a tee, but it will work for a few hundred years
    just fine.... i see that all the time....


    the real problem I see that should have been fixed is the wire going out the side of the slab with no sleeve on it..

    or should that wire have been separately sleeved??

    that will cause them greif some day .

  14. #14

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    I would say something about the clean out and the reducer.

    As far as that wire it looks like dirty yellow romex (spelling). It needs itís own sleeve of some sort. With out getting a better look at the cable Iím 100% sure that cable is not a direct bury.

    I know you said the wires went to the septic tank. Are they for a pump and float system or did you get stuck with an air pump system? You might end up with problems with the other end of those wirers at some point (something to look into). I have found that they skip stuff on one end of something they will skip something on the other end.

  15. #15
    DIY Senior Member MG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by master plumber mark View Post
    Idelally it would have been nicer to see a wye
    instead of a tee, but it will work for a few hundred years
    just fine.... i see that all the time....
    The changeover to PVC for our house required removing one just like that tee. CI ones are a bit larger, but there was nothing wrong with it.

    I'd think with the vertical drop there from above that it would clear ok.
    Last edited by MG; 02-21-2008 at 06:22 AM. Reason: fixed tag
    Note: I am a DIY'er and not a professional. My posts here are observations / opinions and may or may not be in accordance with your local ordinances.

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