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Thread: basic antisiphon set up w/4-5 zones

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    Default basic antisiphon set up w/4-5 zones

    Hello all,This is my first post here... so glad I found this forum. I'm getting ready to dig up my yard to put in a sprinkler system. I'm looking at 4-5 irrigation zones. My question is if I use 4-5 automatic in-line valves can I get away with using one antisiphon valve before the manifold? Does anyone have a diagram or schematic drawing of a basic 4-5 zoned set up? Thanks in advance,george

  2. #2
    Sprinkler Guy Wet_Boots's Avatar
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    The answer to your question is no. Each of the valves would have to be antisyphon. Hopefully you are on flat ground, because the valves have to stand higher than the sprinkler heads and pipes.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Since you are concerned with antisyphon valves you must be using domestic water. Here's a brief description of my system that has worked well for over 20 years. I have a tee in the main supply line. One side of course if for the house and the other is for irrigation. I have a stop and waste valve in the irrigation line right after the tee. From the tee, I come up with 1" copper to about 18" below the surface of the ground. That's where my back flow preventer is located. This is a Watts unit that is attached to the intake and outlet pipes with unions. The outlet pipe is 1" copper for about 3" then transitions to 1-1/2" PVC that runs 30' to my manifold which has 4 electric valves. The zones branch for there. I also have one 1" PVC that is under pressure at all times for hose bibs. Everything is underground. In the fall, I remove the back flow preventer and blow each zone with compressed air. The back flow preventer is stored inside just to be absolutely certain it will not freeze if I don't get all of the water out. In the spring or early summer, my city requires the back flow be recertified by a licensed inspector. With my system, the controller is located in my basement just inside of where the manifold and valves are located so there is no lengthy wiring to worry about.

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    Sprinkler Guy Wet_Boots's Avatar
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    Washington State doesn't yet have the requirement that the lawn sprinkler backflow be toxic-rated. While cheaper than the DCVA used in WA, the antisyphon valves are toxic-rated and can comply with the higher standards of other states.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Guess I'm behind times. I have no clue what this "toxic rating" is. I would have to assume Wet Boots is correct however, what I use now is the same as I started with 20+ years ago. I did have tor replace the original BF preventer a number of years ago, but the replacement was essentially the same as the original. I'll take this as a heads up for something that will probably become a requirement for me sooner or later. Thanks!

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default Bfp

    A single approved antisiphon/backflow preventer DOES replace the individual ones on the valves. However, the ones on the valves are atmospheric type, while the common one has to be either a pressure or reduced pressure principal one, depending on your area's requirements.

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