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Thread: Capping gas line used for dryer

  1. #1

    Default Capping gas line used for dryer

    Hey everyone. Glad I found this forum. I want to cap off a gas line that goes to my current dryer. I'm getting an electric dryer soon. There is a shut off valve on the pipe. I'd like to do this myself if possible to save a few bucks. Basically, I wanted to know what materials I needed to do the job correctly. For now, I'd just want to shut the valve off, detach the line from the dryer and put a cap over the top where the dryer line attached. Thanks for your help. MJ

  2. #2
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Is this a flexible line between the valve and the dryer? If so I doubt that you can find a cap to fit, and there wouldn't be much to gain anyway. The valve shut the gas off. If you want to remove the valve and replace it with a cap, then you would first have to shut off the gas main, remove the valve, and buy a black iron pipe cap. You would need to use either pipe dope or Teflon tape (Yellow for gas) to properly seal the connection. While this is not a technically difficult job, it requires pipe wrenches and some knowledge of how pipes fit together. From the nature of you question, you may not have these thinks and would be well advised to contact a plumber.

  3. #3
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Most places MANDATE that an unused gas valve be capped, for obvious reasons. Assuming your valve has a flare outlet, to which the flex line was attached, get a FLARE CAP from any hardware or plumbing store. Make sure is it a flare cap, and not simple a similarly sized pipe cap, which will NOT seal. Although not required, I put a light brush of teflon dope on the flare, and on the threads.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the help. I'm eventually going to have the actual pipe capped in the basement but in the meantime I just wanted to shut off the valve and cap it just for safety reasons. I'm pretty sure it does have a flare outlet. I've heard just shutting the valve off is fine as well but would feel better knowing there is a cap over the outlet. thanks again.

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member Nate R's Avatar
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    Out of curiosity, why would one go from a gas to electric dryer?

  6. #6

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    Well, I've talked with a few people about this and apparently there is not much of a savings. We got a great deal on an overstock electric dryer. I'd be interested in hearing some opinions on this. I'm not so sure myself.

  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member Nate R's Avatar
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    Well, both gas and electric cycle by temperature, so these #s are probably wrong, since I don't know what the typical "On" time % is. Assuming they both run 30 minutes of the burner or element being on for a load:

    Gas dryers I've seen are ~22000 BTU. Run that for a 1/2 hour and it's .11 Therms. Electric Dryer I looked at was 5600 Watts. Run that for a 1/2 hour and it's 2.8 KWH.

    For me, gas is about $1.30/Therm. So a load of clothes in a normal gas dryer would be about 14 cents. I pay 11.7 cents/KWH, so a load in a normal electric dryer would be about 33 cents.

    Lifetime of what, 10 years? If you did 4 loads a week, you're looking at .19 savings/load X 4 times a week X 52 weeks a year X 10 years = $395.20 savings w/ gas over electric.

    BUT, that's $40/year difference. Less than 4 bucks a month. Not noticed at all by many people. You'll have to look at the figures for your dryers and your utility prices, as well as your usage. Those prices will definitely change over time, making prediction of savings/loss harder.
    Last edited by Nate R; 02-25-2008 at 10:36 AM. Reason: Changed dryer to 5600 watts from 5700.

  8. #8
    DIY Senior Member Nate R's Avatar
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    Oh, found a spreadsheet to better analyze this: http://www.jimcarson.com/a/gas_versus_electric.xls

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    A gas dryer, except in rare circumstances, is almost always significantly cheaper to run than an electric one. They cost more to buy, but depending on how often it is used, would probably be paid back in a year or so. If you have to pay someone to run new electrical supply to convert to electric, that could easily offset the cost of staying with gas on initial installed price.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Doesn't the electric company use gas to make steam at its generating plants?

    Seems like a No-Brainer here!

  11. #11
    Consultant cwhyu2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood View Post
    Doesn't the electric company use gas to make steam at its generating plants?

    Seems like a No-Brainer here!
    May be a coal fired plant or nucular not that it makes any differance rates
    still to high IMHO

  12. #12
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Yea, I gotta love that Nuclear "To Cheap to Meter" electricity! Remember when they were saying that?

  13. #13
    Consultant cwhyu2's Avatar
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    Sorry about the spelling my freind was talking to me as I was typing didnt catch
    it untill you posted back Redwood

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