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Thread: Screw in ABS vent pipe

  1. #1

    Default Screw in ABS vent pipe

    I just realized while attaching the sheetrock in my shower remodel that I screwed directly in to an ABS vent pipe. Was attaching bottom of sheet into the sole plate, so not worried about hitting studs and sure enough I hit the drain pipe straight on. The screw pulled the sheet rock in tight, just like it was standard 2X4. My question is, is this going to cause a problem? It is a standard drywall screw,securely embedded in the pipe about an ch above the concrete. If a problem, what is the best fix? ABS patch or ...?
    Thanks for any of your thoughts. Frank
    Last edited by Frank52; 02-21-2008 at 08:45 PM. Reason: Word choice

  2. #2
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Yes it will. cut the pipe at the hole and reconnect the 2 peices of pipe with a banded coupling.

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    On another front, hopefully, that sheetrock is not IN the shower area (unless you are installing a sheet membrane on top of it like Kerdi from www.schluter.com). NOrmally, except above the shower head, drywall has no place in a shower.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4

    Default Am using Kerdi system

    Can anyone explain the failure I should expect due to the screw into the ABS?

  5. #5
    Commercial Plumber markts30's Avatar
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    Screw will rust out leaving a hole in pipe and sewer gas will cause odor in surrounding areas...(some water may leak out as well - but that is unlikely)...
    Hole may also result in a weak spot where pipe will break in future if stress is placed on pipe...

  6. #6

    Smile Screw in ABS pipe

    I was installing a new curtain rod and unknowingly screwed into an ABS pipe from the upstairs bathroom. A few weeks later there was an unmistable sewer odor in the room where we hung the curtains. We called in a plumber and he discovered the leaking ABS pipe. His solution was simple. He cut a hole in the wallboard to expose the leak in the ABS pipe, removed my screw and applied glue to a short stainless steel screw and screwed in back into the ABS pipe. Problem solved, at least, in the short term.

    Nicker1

  7. #7

    Default Thanks to everyone for the help

    I feared the potential corrosion problem, I would rather not cut the pipe and apply sleeve as I am unsure I would be able to get enough clearance to get a coupler on, as the pipe goes staright up to the roof. The sheetrock also has no clearance from the pipe and I would have to gouge out sheetrock for coupler,weakening the sheetrock. In addition to stainless steel screw, I had thought of cutting a rubber tubing adapter,wrapping it around the pipe and positioning the hose clamp directly over the hole. Any thoughts or warnings appreciated as I would like to have this solved in a manner I could rest easy with.

  8. #8
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    I'd consider just the silicon and a SS screw. I know with pvc, you can carefully heat say a screwdriver and use it to melt the hole closed if you are careful...don't know about abs.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  9. #9
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Now you know why we are required to place nail plates over any pipe going through wood. A coupling split slightly more than half way down the center, long ways. Use the larger half. cut or grind the center ridge out, and glue it over the hole. If you cut it properly, it will "snap" onto the pipe and keep itself positioned until it dries.

  10. #10
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    I seldom disagree with the pros on this forum, but there is no need to make such a big deal about repairing this hole. The stainless steel screw and epoxy will out last you and your children. This is a vent, not a drain, so there will never be any water in it to rust a screw of any kind, and there will never be any pressure in the pipe. If we were dealing with a sewer line, that might be a different matter although I think a stainless steel screw and marine epoxy would likely work OK there, too.

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