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Thread: Hello - New person here.

  1. #1

    Default Hello - New person here.

    Hello. I found this site doing some online research regarding several well-related issues.
    Unfortunately, I know absolutely nothing about plumbing and wells - although I've learned quite a bit in the last five years. I still have a lot to learn and can't afford to shell out anymore to my plumber until I have a very good understanding of what needs to be done. I've spent too much already on exploratory repairs.
    I have a tankless water heater that is used to heat the water and the house. I've replaced the heater coils once so far due to water hardness - not a big deal - the house is 8 years old.
    I flush the rusco filter every 3 - 4 days. - spin down 1000 micron - go through 6 filters a year. I rinse out the faucet spouts twice a month to clear collecting sand. I also find what looks like sand in the bathtub after running a bath and letting the water sit for a few minutes. Replaced my shower head every 2 - 3 months (or clean it out with a toothpick). I've replaced both diverter valves in the showers and learned the pipes upstairs are reverse in the process. I had a stainless steel whole house filter installed (not sure if it's before the tank or after) I do know it's connected to the pipe coming out of the wall - i'm guessing it was installed in front of the tank. I flush the whole house filter same time I flush the rusco sediment filter. I had hoped the whole house filter would solve the problem - I thought it might take awhile if there is sand build-up in the tank or pipes but it's been 2 years now. I can not run the upstairs shower and downstairs at the same time - the upstairs shower will not have (0) water pressure.
    My plumber has suggested installing a hot water storage tank but there is no room in the boiler room for one and he has also suggested raising the pump. Raising the pump sounded good but it's expensive. Is that something that can be done easily by the homeowner?

    Any idea of what is causing the sediment issue and little water pressure? Any thoughts and/or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    As far as raising the pump goes, we need to know how deep it is first.

  3. #3
    Like an engineer alternety's Avatar
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    And what kind of pipe.

  4. #4
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    You need a water softener to treat the cause of the problem rather than try to work around the symptoms of hard water.

    Take some of the "sand" and put it in a cap full of vinegar, if the stuff dissolves, it isn't sand, it's probably little balls of hard water scale. If it doesn't dissolve, it's probably sand and you need a better sand filter. I have a very good one.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  5. #5

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    The stainless steel whole house filter is a Lakso Sand Master and it's connected to the copper pipe from the wall that leads to the holding tank, and the rusco sediment filter is connected after the tank to the pipes leading up into the house and into the boiler.

    I do not know how deep the well is - How do I find out? I live next to a lake and you can't dig far without hitting bedrock.

    I will try the vinegar test and let you know what happens.

    I know other than the hardness the water quality is great. No smell or discoloration and tasteless. Plus I had it tested 5 years ago - no contaminents.

  6. #6
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    Those centrifugal sand seperators do not work on fine sand. The sand won't spin out of solution quick enough to be trapped out.

    A sand filter is the best solution if you have room for it. It can be the same size as a water softener and can be backwashed manually or automatically, price is the only deciding factor there. Whole house filters are a joke and are too small to do the job. The guy that gave them the name "Whole House Filters" should be hung by his thumbs.

    bob...

  7. #7
    Architect Spaceman Spiff's Avatar
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    if you had a whole house of them paralleled they'd work just fine... haha
    Spaceman Spiff aka Mike

  8. #8
    Like an engineer alternety's Avatar
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    The Zenon (GE) filters should fix it.

    No, I don't have any financial interest. They just solve problems like this with no hassle. And no one on here seems interested in mentioning them to people except me.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by alternety View Post
    The Zenon (GE) filters should fix it.

    No, I don't have any financial interest. They just solve problems like this with no hassle. And no one on here seems interested in mentioning them to people except me.
    Would I replace the Lakso SandMaster with the Zenon GE filter?
    I googled Xenon GE filter and found the following:

    http://www.homespring.com/how_it_works.shtml

    Is that what you are referring to?

    Thank you all for your responses. I still have to test the "sand" to see if it's really water scale. Just been busy...
    Last edited by struong; 03-20-2008 at 03:48 PM.

  10. #10
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    I would suggest contacting a Zenon dealer and describing what you are taking out. See how it handles your amount and coarseness of sand.

  11. #11
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alternety View Post
    The Zenon (GE) filters should fix it.

    No, I don't have any financial interest. They just solve problems like this with no hassle. And no one on here seems interested in mentioning them to people except me.
    That's because they are very expensive to buy, operate and maintain, very few dealers sell them, and in this case, it is huge overkill.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  12. #12
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    And it would be misapplied.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  13. #13
    Like an engineer alternety's Avatar
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    Yes Garry, they are expensive to buy. Operation costs amount to the flush water. Maintenance involves a once a year test of the membrane and change of the carbon filter if you are using one. Otherwise the owner has nothing to do. No checking for clogged filters, no replacing filter elements. It just sits there and removes particulate matter in water down to the size of viruses.

    And they many not be appropriate for this application; note I suggested a dealer be consulted. If it hardness being interpreted as sand it will obviously not help.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by alternety View Post
    Yes Garry, they are expensive to buy. Operation costs amount to the flush water. Maintenance involves a once a year test of the membrane and change of the carbon filter if you are using one. Otherwise the owner has nothing to do. No checking for clogged filters, no replacing filter elements. It just sits there and removes particulate matter in water down to the size of viruses.

    And they many not be appropriate for this application; note I suggested a dealer be consulted. If it hardness being interpreted as sand it will obviously not help.
    I placed the "sand" in the vinegar and it did not dissolve. Although it worked well on the kitchen sink sprayer and shower head.

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