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Thread: Geothermal heat pump

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  1. #1

    Default Geothermal heat pump

    Did anyone watch Dirty Jobs? It demonstrated doing a thermal well, those people were amazing.

    *I corrected what they called a thermal well to, Geothermal heat pump.
    Last edited by Cookie; 02-14-2008 at 08:05 AM.

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    What's a Thermal Well Cookie?

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    Computer Programmer Bill Arden's Avatar
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    Google: Geothermal heat pump

    It's the cheapest way to heat or cool a building.

    I have looked at adding them, but I don't have the money.

    The well is drilled just like a regular well, except that plastic can be used for the wall. Others remove the pipe after drilling.

    Either way you are left with a long piece of tubing that goes down ~100 feet and then loops back up the same hole. The tubing is generally cemented/grouted in place.
    Important note Ė I donít know man made laws, just laws of physics
    Disclaimer: I'm a big fan of Darwin awards.

  4. #4

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    Yep, that is it. It really was interesting and worth watching. Although, a really messy job, you got to love mud.

    http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-schedule...1.25321.4062.x
    Last edited by Cookie; 02-13-2008 at 05:47 PM.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default well

    An offshoot of that process is to use two wells fairly close together. Pump water out of the first one and circulate it through the heat exchanger and then deposit it down the second one. The distance between the wells allows the water to stabilize to the ambient temperature. And since it is a closed system, there is no contamination.

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    I have always referred to them as a Ground Water Heat Pump.

    I am not so sure the claims made by some are all they are cracked up to be. I had one at a home I owned here in Florida and didn't see any substantial savings. There is certainly more maintenance to one over a conventional heat pump.

    Your right Cookie, Rotary drilling is a messy profession. Drilling Mud is nasty.

    bob...

  7. #7
    Rancher
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    Bob,

    I have one of those Ground Source Heat Pump, it's only 10' underground so no water is involved, in fact if they use the drilled well method and hit water, they must grout it and drill thru it, the well is then filled with crusher fines.

    What is the extra maintence, I've done nothing in the past 12 years.

    Rancher

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    Quote Originally Posted by speedbump View Post
    What's a Thermal Well Cookie?


    Thermal well is use to control water cooling and heating system
    Too many of us are hung up on what we don't have, can't have, or won't ever have. We spend too much energy being down, when we could use that same energy - if not less of it - doing, or at least trying to do, some of the things we really want to do like solar training?

  9. #9

    Default Would like to use a cistern as my water source for GSHP

    Greetings! I am new to this forum, my first post. I have a question and have been searching for an answer. I live in Metro Phoenix, AZ and want to install an open loop GSHP system using a cistern for water source and return. My home is a 2 story and currently has 2-3 ton air to air HP's. Reading from several sources I would need about 18 gpm of water. How many gallon capacity buried fiberglass cistern would I need? I plan to use the water to irrigate a small area in the back yard and collect water from the roof to add to the cistern when available. Not allowed to drill a well in the neighborhood and am on city water and sewer.

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    Computer Programmer Bill Arden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CWinAZ View Post
    Metro Phoenix, AZ ... open loop GSHP system using a cistern for water source and return.
    Ouch.

    It's not just the flow rate. you need to figure out how the water is going to be cooled back off again.

    I would suggest you start with a closed loop drilled well system. to save costs you could start with cooling only using a water "A" coil or some other water to air radiator.

    The closed loop wells last "almost" forever so in your case it is a good way to start.

    Edit:
    "almost forever" in this case is defined as the life expectancy of burred black plastic pipe.
    I believe it's in the 100's of years so it can be considered a gift to future generations since heat pumps are likely to be used more and more in the future.
    Last edited by Bill Arden; 04-28-2008 at 03:13 AM.
    Important note Ė I donít know man made laws, just laws of physics
    Disclaimer: I'm a big fan of Darwin awards.

  11. #11

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    Theoretical question. How far down would you have to dig a well so that when water is dropped down it will return as steam to power a turbine?

    Couldn't you theoretically power a place for virtually free with a deep enough well?

    Does this make any sense?

    Tom

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    That is a good question. I know you can do it in parts of Colorado.

    bob...

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Geothermal steam very much depends on where you live. In Iceland, they generate nearly all of their electricity that way, but then the island is essentially an old volcano. In some places, it is feasible, in others, it isn't, and unless very near the surface, unlikely to be useful on an individual level. Now, if you live near Yellowstone, maybe it would be fairly easy to tap a hot spring.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Computer Programmer Bill Arden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by statjunk View Post
    Theoretical question. How far down would you have to dig a well so that when water is dropped down it will return as steam to power a turbine?
    I believe it was 4 miles here in MN when I looked it up.

    Drilling a 100 foot well costs $3000 so.... a deep enough well to create power would be way to expensive here.

    Edit: I would be far better off investing in that company that wants to do "hot dry geothermal power" in Yellowstone.
    Last edited by Bill Arden; 04-30-2008 at 05:42 AM.
    Important note Ė I donít know man made laws, just laws of physics
    Disclaimer: I'm a big fan of Darwin awards.

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    Not to mention when drilling that deep they start out very big at the top and scale down as they go. The deeper they go, the harder it is and the longer it takes. So by conventional standards, there would be no comparison to cost.

    bob...

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