(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Surge Protection

Hybrid View

  1. #1

    Default Surge Protection

    Have a relative adding a new entertainment upgrade. One of which is an LCD TV. All outlets are two prong not three. To get the benefit from a good surge protector doesn't the outlet have to be three prong? I'm trying to remember if some tv manufacturers stress a three pronged outlet..... Thanks

  2. #2
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    1,328

    Default

    Yes, you'll want to have a ground for the system. In addition a good double conversion UPS for the TV and Audio/Video equipment would be wise.

    Jason

  3. #3
    Electrician Chris75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Litchfield, CT
    Posts
    608

    Default

    I dont believe a surge protector shunts the surge to ground, so I see little benefit in that respect, and since most residential appliances do not use a ground either, again I dont see a problem... If you wanted a 3 prong receptacle without rewiring your current receptacle a GFCI is legal to install in place of the 2 wire receptacle.


    You have to remember that the ground is for clearing ground faults... in other words, its there to connect the non-current carrying metal parts of equipment to the system grounded conductor at the service equipment.
    Last edited by Chris75; 01-21-2008 at 06:24 PM.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris75 View Post
    I dont believe a surge protector shunts the surge to ground, so I see little benefit in that respect, and since most residential appliances do not use a ground either, again I dont see a problem... If you wanted a 3 prong receptacle without rewiring your current receptacle a GFCI is legal to install in place of the 2 wire receptacle.


    You have to remember that the ground is for clearing ground faults... in other words, its there to connect the non-current carrying metal parts of equipment to the system grounded conductor at the service equipment.
    I thought the GFI basically was to disconnect power from appliance out to source.. So your saying the GFI receptacle will protect a voltage surge coming in also?

  5. #5
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,307

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jed54 View Post
    I thought the GFI basically was to disconnect power from appliance out to source.. So your saying the GFI receptacle will protect a voltage surge coming in also?

    No, it will not.

    A GFI receptacle measures the difference between the current (amps) going out on the hot wire and the amps returning on the neutral. If the current in the hot wire is more than that returning on the neutral by more than 0.006 Amp, then it shuts off the hot wire.

    A surge can be a voltage spike (say 200 or 1000 Volts when it should be 120 Volts), or it can be a general increase in voltage (say 140 Volts when it should be 120 Volts). Neither of those will trip a GFCI unless they cause a current to GROUND which results in a difference between hot and neutral.

    A surge protector responds to a difference in VOLTAGE between two conductors and uses a special device within the surge protector to limit that voltage difference by dumping the energy of that voltage difference to the other conductor of the pair being protected by the surge protector.

    The surge protector may have several different pairs that it is protecting. For example, a protector for a 240 Volt circuit such as a "whole-house" protector would protect between the two hot lines, and between each hot and neutral. Some might also protect between the lines and ground but the neutral is usually connected to ground at the service panel.

    Surge protectors are often destroyed by the surge and must be replaced.

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,405

    Default

    The best protection would be a double-conversion UPS, but for most things, that's overkill. If you look at some of the surge suppressors designed especially for entertainment systems, most of them have significant guarantees on connected equipment - up to $250K or more on some of them. If the surge suppressor sacrifices itself, and your connected equipment is unharmed, though, many won't warranty the device; but, if it dies AND you equipment dies, they'll pay to replace it all, up to the warranty.

    The surge suppressor itself needs to be plugged into a grounded outlet, but the devices coming in do not. Depending on how much protection you want to have, a decent one costs at least $100, and you can spend significantly more. The better ones not only do surge suppression, but also filter noise up on the powerline - including noise that may be injected from one device to another. The magic numbers to look at are how many joules it can absorb and how fast it can respond.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7

    Default

    I have an RCA 1500 Joules six tap surge protector which I haven't used for any reason. Would this be adequate for this? In place of adding another line/circuit. Or should it still be wired correctly?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •