(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 57

Thread: Bath Tub Drain Removal

  1. #16
    DIY Senior Member Mike Swearingen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On Albemarle Sound In Northeastern NC
    Posts
    621

    Default

    A tub drain "dumbell" will only work when a tub drain has the crosspieces for it to grip.
    If using my method, you don't drive the chisel or screwdriver INTO the notch, you just catch the edge of the notch to CAREFULLY AND SLOWLY drive it around. It WILL work,if you do it right.
    Mike

  2. #17
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    indianapolis indiana - land of the free, home of the brave....
    Posts
    4,244
    Blog Entries
    1

    Talking just beat the tar out of it.

    the only sure way to do this is to get a hammer, a very small cold chisel with a sharp mean little edje
    and a can of WD 40.


    by spraying down that lip is will loosen it up a tad. They you simply have to chisle and cut that lip all the way into the drain. you are making a cut through that brass flange or lip and it willl eventyally give , keep spraying the wd 40 into the gap if it doesent give, you just got to keep cutting into the drain.

    and of course you want to chisel in the direction (counter clock wise) to persuade the flange to come loose.

    the only real risk you take with any approach is chipping the tub near youir attack point. Try not to "dig down " into the metal underneath the tub....

    try not to hit the tub with your hammer on your back swing either. (thats bad)

    just get a small sharp chisel and keep it eating on the brass only.

    the WD 40 is optional. but it seems to at least morally help.

    good luck.
    Last edited by master plumber mark; 04-07-2005 at 05:21 AM.

  3. #18
    DIY Senior Member captwally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    102

    Default Tub Drain Removal revisited with questions

    I am a newly appointed maintenance supervisor for a large 30 year old apartment complex. I have lots of experience in lots of things but sometimes I come up with something I need a bit of help with, I admit. One of the things is removal of a bathtub drain when the strainer and bottom cross has been torn out. I can answer a lot of the people's previously posted problems. (I guess this is late compared to those postings, but I just joined) The answer is not beating the hell out of the drain fitting or sawing a notch or wedge and using a hammer and chisel. The answer is a nice large easy-out or left hand extractor. It will twist right out without damaging the tub or porcelain finish. My problem is that I cannot find one! Can anyone help with a supplier that sells #9 and larger extractors, more commonly known as "Easy-Outs"? My largest is a #9 and it easily can remove a broken 1" fitting, but nothing larger. I know larger ones are manufactured, even for removing fittings up to 4 inches. Any Ideas, guys?

  4. #19
    DIY Senior Member captwally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    102

    Unhappy Oh and By The Way

    BTW, I am not interested in saving anything but the Tub. I have lousy access from the bedroom closet through a 12" x 12" hole. I will be replacing all the drain fittings, but removing the tub is not an option. I could theoretically leave the drain elbow in place, but I can't un-thread the tee that holds the tub stopper until that drain flange has been removed.

  5. #20
    Plumber RioHyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    339

    Default

    Captwally, if you can find one let me know. However, cutting a wedge out of the drain flange and prying it out isnt that difficult...for me anyway. Of course I've been removing old drain flanges this way for a long time and the old timer who showed me how, even longer.

  6. #21

    Default

    Give the rectorseal golden extractor a try...

    I picked one up about a month ago at a trade show and it works pretty nice. But, I've already had a couple drains it won't take apart and any easy-out wouldn't have helped either. So I was back doing it the way my dad taught me, with the 15 cent 6" hacksaw blade and my flat screwdriver, gets them out everytime.
    I also have an old Ridgid multi sized internal pipe wrench that fits alot of the drains and will take some of them apart also. The problem is, the threads can be so corroded or "fused" together that it doesn't matter whether you use an easy-out or anything that will try to unscrew the drain, It won't work because it will break the waste shoe off at the fine threads on the 90. Then it just spins in the tub unless you have a helper or someway of rigging a backup on the drain shoe under the tub. So even if you spend all that extra money on nice tools, they don't always work.

  7. #22
    DIY Senior Member captwally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Why do we do this for a living? Trying to unthread 30 year old things behind walls through a tiny opening, snaking roof vents, drains and pulling huge wads of hair out... Hmmm..... Shouldn't I be on a beach in the Caribbean?

  8. #23
    DIY Senior Member captwally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Thanks, Clayton

    If we could be enhanced in some way, most people say they would want wings. Well, I'm already a pilot, but what I could really use is an extra elbow and an eyeball on the end of one of my fingers. I found a source for the Ridgid Internal wrench, and will try that (My Tenants can't wait either). It looks promising.

  9. #24
    DIY Junior Member Brainodo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1

    Talking Thank You

    Hello,

    I am just a newbie here and wanted to say thanks. I had the same problem with the two bath tubs in my house. I was looking around on the internet and looking for a tool to remove the drains and saw this post and decided to get the hack saw and screw driver a shot and WHOOPPPEEE it worked like a charm on both drains.

    Thanks again you guys saved me some time and money.
    Terry

  10. #25
    DIY Junior Member michaelait's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    1

    Default I cut a wedge out of flange, and it worked

    Hi, new to this forum. Yes, I tried all the other ideas for removing flange, without success. I gave up and tried the hack saw, cut out wedge idea. It worked like a champ. I cut out an area the length of the flange and about 1/2 inch wide. Then I took hammer and chisel and the piece popped out. Then it was a matter of hammering carefully to pry loose the entire flange. It then began to un-thread. I am a happy camper. Thanks to you folks for the idea. Happy New Year (2008)!

  11. #26
    DIY Junior Member jimhls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tampa Bay, FL
    Posts
    2

    Wink Jim H

    I used the saw blade to cut the notch in my drain then the tapping with a hammer and screwdriver and it worked.
    THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU. This site and you guys were a big help.

    Jim

    Quote Originally Posted by Carob View Post
    Hello.

    I'm hoping someone might have an idea or two for me on this subject.

    I have two bath tubs that have drains that need to be replaced. The problem is that I can't get them out. They are in such bad shape that the crossmembers are all busted off that the tub drain removal tool is supposed to use to unscrew and remove.

    The suggestion that was given to me by Home Depot and Ace Hardware is to hammer a screwdriver (or something) into the side of the drain to use for leverage. I can't even manage to do that. (I can barely put a dent into it.) I thought about trying to drill a hole into the side of it but I'm scared to do that because I don't want to go through and damage the threads preventing putting a new one in.

    Does anyone have any advice on how I can get these drains out and still be able to screw in new one?

    Thanks very much!!!

  12. #27

    Default

    Well, now that it's done, I'll tell you how I do it. (Sorry, I didn't notice this sooner.)

    I use a Dremel tool with a carbide blade. (Wear goggles!) I cut a ring at the same level as the tub, below the flange of the strainer, and the top of it pops right out. Then, if I need to get the rest out of the strainer, I use a small screwdriver and hammer to pop the brass threads away from the shoe. This can be a problem if the tub drain isn't accessible, in case the old rubber joints get messed up. But usually, I'm replacing the entire drain so getting the strainer loose from the tub is all I'm interested in.

  13. #28
    DIY Junior Member shimp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    3

    Default

    get a dremel tool, u'll be able to cut /grind as needed, even from inside the drain once u cut away the screen

  14. #29
    DIY Junior Member citm2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    9

    Default

    The dumbell tool was the first thing I tried -- the crossmember broke immediately. I bought an expensive tool called the drainkey, which expands upon turning in the direction that should loosen the drain, but it just turns freely, no matter how tight I try to make it.

    I attempted to cut a notch in it to use the screwdriver trick and it would seem that the THING IS MADE OF PLASTIC!!!!!

    It wasn't a layer of metal that had corroded -- it was some sort of metal flake/veneer that had begun to peel off. The drainkey just digs up the plastic inside the flange's pipe piece.

    The notch I cut in the flange fortunately doesn't go all the way through, but it was immediately apparent that I was cutting into plastic, not metal.

    I'm not sure how to proceed. If I cut off the flange from the rest -- what if I cannot get the remaining piece with the male threads out of the inside of the pipe?

  15. #30
    DIY Junior Member citm2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    9

    Default

    OK - it isn't actually made of plastic -- just some dull grey soft metal. I don't think it's old enough to be lead (house built in 1988). It has some flaky shiny veneer which is peeling off (the reason for replacing it in the first place.

    I cut a couple of notches and tried to hammer on it, but the screwdriver is actually driving into the metal instead of moving it. Any ideas?

Similar Threads

  1. Bath Tub Removal & Installation
    By FJK in forum Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-10-2007, 04:22 PM
  2. Tool for bath tub drain removal
    By garyl53 in forum Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-02-2007, 12:18 PM
  3. Bath tile removal
    By teebone in forum Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-11-2006, 03:04 PM
  4. Master Bath ball faucet leaks-stem removal??
    By movingsoonMD in forum Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Tricks
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-18-2006, 08:04 PM
  5. bath drain removal
    By Howard in forum Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-24-2004, 08:15 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •